Free Binary Options Ebook: How to Trade Binary Options ...

The first official release of the ZOIA Librarian app is now available!

Version 1.0 is now out for Windows 10, Mac OS X, and Linux (Ubuntu)! It can be downloaded here https://github.com/meanmedianmoge/zoia_lib - see the "How to Install" section.
EDIT: Mac 1.0 release has been updated (see the link above to download the zip), and it should open successfully upon double-clicking the .app file! Apologies for any inconvenience.
If you have a GitHub account, feel free to create an issue regarding any performance issues you encounter. If you don't have a GitHub account, send feedback and bugs to me at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
Overview and tutorial video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLOUrWtG1Pk
User Manual: https://github.com/meanmedianmoge/zoia_lib/blob/mastedocumentation/User%20Manuals/ZOIA%20Librarian%20-%20User%20Manual%20-%20Version%201.0.pdf
Changelog is below. Special thanks to our beta testers, contributors, and supporters for the interest in this application!
Patch Notes Version 1.0 (September 25, 2020)
New Features - Finalized ZOIA binary parsing implementation. Again, massive thanks to djigneo/apparent1 for the initial C# code. As of this release, all features of the patch are fully exposed and can be decoded into a JSON object for further use. - Patch visualizer has been updated with more information to help you understand patches at a quick-glance. - Added the ability to search and sort for patches by author name. This applies to Local and Bank tabs only. PS tab author search and sort will not be supported at this time due to the API structure. - Updated patch importing so that patches with near-identical names are merged upon import (instead of strictly identical names). - Updated the behavior of the SD and Bank tables so that multiples can be selected and moved in different ways: Hold Shift and click the start and end patches to move and/or Hold Ctrl/Cmd and click on each patch you'd like to move. - Patches can now be moved into a bank in the following ways: Dragging single or multiple selections (similar options as above) at once and/or Clicking the Add to Bank button for single selections at a time. - Added a Clear Bank button to wipe the bank tables clean. - Added a new Help toolbar which allows users to access documentation and useful ZOIA resources. These will display in the PS tab browser panel. You can also search for different commands/shortcuts. - Added a Reset UI menu option in the event that users mangle the UI panels or tables. - Updated the light theme colors to give it a more muted look. - Alternating row colors is now a saved preference. It will save whatever is the current setting upon closing the application. - Added a step-by-step guide for how to compile the application from source for developers, contributors or users who were unable to open the beta builds. - Added our first Linux build! We aim to support the latest stable version of Ubuntu going forward. If you are a Linux user who prefers other distributions, please contact me.
Fixes - Fixed an issue that occurred while importing a version history (Mac). - Removed the threads used with menu action multi-import functions (Mac temporary fix). - Fixed an issue where the dates of imported patches were back-dated to the history of the SD card. - Fixed an issue with SD card imported files having mangled filenames (Windows). This also caused patches to not export properly. - Fixed an issue where changing the font/font size didn't apply to themes or buttons.
Known Issues - Certain patch binaries cannot be fully decoded due to being saved on deprecated ZOIA firmware. - Saved UI preferences are not being applied correctly for the Local Storage tab - specifically the vertical splitter (Mac).
Future Plans - Expansion view of routing for patch visualizer. Right now, the connections are displayed on a module-block level, but not from a general patch level. The expander would provide an in-depth visualization of audio and CV routing, likely to be displayed in a new tab. - Extend the binary decoder methods into an API for other applications/programs to utilize. - Simplify and automate code structure for releases (currently, a minimal-working version of the code needs to be created for the app-building process). - Allow for custom themes/colors in the UI. - Actually fix threading issues associated with menu action multi-imports.
As always, we welcome any feedback you may have. Thanks for being awesome :) - Mike M.
submitted by meanmedianmoge to ZOIA [link] [comments]

Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform Instruction Manual for Windows Powershell

Introduction to the manual
This manual is made to guide you step by step in setting up an OpenShift cloud environment on your own device. It will tell you what needs to be done, when it needs to be done, what you will be doing and why you will be doing it, all in one convenient manual that is made for Windows users. Although if you'd want to try it on Linux or MacOS we did add the commands necesary to get the CodeReady Containers to run on your operating system. Be warned however there are some system requirements that are necessary to run the CodeReady Containers that we will be using. These requirements are specified within chapter Minimum system requirements.
This manual is written for everyone with an interest in the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform and has at least a basic understanding of the command line within PowerShell on Windows. Even though it is possible to use most of the manual for Linux or MacOS we will focus on how to do this within Windows.
If you follow this manual you will be able to do the following items by yourself:
● Installing the CodeReady Containers
● Updating OpenShift
● Configuring a CodeReady Container
● Configuring the DNS
● Accessing the OpenShift cluster
● Deploying the Mediawiki application
What is the OpenShift Container platform?
Red Hat OpenShift is a cloud development Platform as a Service (PaaS). It enables developers to develop and deploy their applications on a cloud infrastructure. It is based on the Kubernetes platform and is widely used by developers and IT operations worldwide. The OpenShift Container platform makes use of CodeReady Containers. CodeReady Containers are pre-configured containers that can be used for developing and testing purposes. There are also CodeReady Workspaces, these workspaces are used to provide any member of the development or IT team with a consistent, secure, and zero-configuration development environment.
The OpenShift Container Platform is widely used because it helps the programmers and developers make their application faster because of CodeReady Containers and CodeReady Workspaces and it also allows them to test their application in the same environment. One of the advantages provided by OpenShift is the efficient container orchestration. This allows for faster container provisioning, deploying and management. It does this by streamlining and automating the automation process.
What knowledge is required or recommended to proceed with the installation?
To be able to follow this manual some knowledge is mandatory, because most of the commands are done within the Command Line interface it is necessary to know how it works and how you can browse through files/folders. If you either don’t have this basic knowledge or have trouble with the basic Command Line Interface commands from PowerShell, then a cheat sheet might offer some help. We recommend the following cheat sheet for windows:
Https://www.sans.org/security-resources/sec560/windows\_command\_line\_sheet\_v1.pdf
Another option is to read through the operating system’s documentation or introduction guides. Though the documentation can be overwhelming by the sheer amount of commands.
Microsoft: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-serveadministration/windows-commands/windows-commands
MacOS
Https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/mac-terminal-commands-cheat-sheet/
Linux
https://ubuntu.com/tutorials/command-line-for-beginners#2-a-brief-history-lesson https://www.guru99.com/linux-commands-cheat-sheet.html
http://cc.iiti.ac.in/docs/linuxcommands.pdf
Aside from the required knowledge there are also some things that can be helpful to know just to make the use of OpenShift a bit simpler. This consists of some general knowledge on PaaS like Dockers and Kubernetes.
Docker https://www.docker.com/
Kubernetes https://kubernetes.io/

System requirements

Minimum System requirements

The minimum system requirements for the Red Hat OpenShift CodeReady Containers has the following minimum hardware:
Hardware requirements
Code Ready Containers requires the following system resources:
● 4 virtual CPU’s
● 9 GB of free random-access memory
● 35 GB of storage space
● Physical CPU with Hyper-V (intel) or SVM mode (AMD) this has to be enabled in the bios
Software requirements
The minimum system requirements for the Red Hat OpenShift CodeReady Containers has the following minimum operating system requirements:
Microsoft Windows
On Microsoft Windows, the Red Hat OpenShift CodeReady Containers requires the Windows 10 Pro Fall Creators Update (version 1709) or newer. CodeReady Containers does not work on earlier versions or other editions of Microsoft Windows. Microsoft Windows 10 Home Edition is not supported.
macOS
On macOS, the Red Hat OpenShift CodeReady Containers requires macOS 10.12 Sierra or newer.
Linux
On Linux, the Red Hat OpenShift CodeReady Containers is only supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux/CentOS 7.5 or newer and on the latest two stable Fedora releases.
When using Red Hat Enterprise Linux, the machine running CodeReady Containers must be registered with the Red Hat Customer Portal.
Ubuntu 18.04 LTS or newer and Debian 10 or newer are not officially supported and may require manual set up of the host machine.

Required additional software packages for Linux

The CodeReady Containers on Linux require the libvirt and Network Manager packages to run. Consult the following table to find the command used to install these packages for your Linux distribution:
Table 1.1 Package installation commands by distribution
Linux Distribution Installation command
Fedora Sudo dnf install NetworkManager
Red Hat Enterprise Linux/CentOS Su -c 'yum install NetworkManager'
Debian/Ubuntu Sudo apt install qemu-kvm libvirt-daemonlibvirt-daemon-system network-manage

Installation

Getting started with the installation

To install CodeReady Containers a few steps must be undertaken. Because an OpenShift account is necessary to use the application this will be the first step. An account can be made on “https://www.openshift.com/”, where you need to press login and after that select the option “Create one now”
After making an account the next step is to download the latest release of CodeReady Containers and the pulled secret on “https://cloud.redhat.com/openshift/install/crc/installer-provisioned”. Make sure to download the version corresponding to your platform and/or operating system. After downloading the right version, the contents have to be extracted from the archive to a location in your $PATH. The pulled secret should be saved because it is needed later.
The command line interface has to be opened before we can continue with the installation. For windows we will use PowerShell. All the commands we use during the installation procedure of this guide are going to be done in this command line interface unless stated otherwise. To be able to run the commands within the command line interface, use the command line interface to go to the location in your $PATH where you extracted the CodeReady zip.
If you have installed an outdated version and you wish to update, then you can delete the existing CodeReady Containers virtual machine with the $crc delete command. After deleting the container, you must replace the old crc binary with a newly downloaded binary of the latest release.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc delete 
When you have done the previous steps please confirm that the correct and up to date crc binary is in use by checking it with the $crc version command, this should provide you with the version that is currently installed.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc version 
To set up the host operating system for the CodeReady Containers virtual machine you have to run the $crc setup command. After running crc setup, crc start will create a minimal OpenShift 4 cluster in the folder where the executable is located.
C:\Users\[username]>crc setup 

Setting up CodeReady Containers

Now we need to set up the new CodeReady Containers release with the $crc setup command. This command will perform the operations necessary to run the CodeReady Containers and create the ~/.crc directory if it did not previously exist. In the process you have to supply your pulled secret, once this process is completed you have to reboot your system. When the system has restarted you can start the new CodeReady Containers virtual machine with the $crc start command. The $crc start command starts the CodeReady virtual machine and OpenShift cluster.
You cannot change the configuration of an existing CodeReady Containers virtual machine. So if you have a CodeReady Containers virtual machine and you want to make configuration changes you need to delete the virtual machine with the $crc delete command and create a new virtual machine and start that one with the configuration changes. Take note that deleting the virtual machine will also delete the data stored in the CodeReady Containers. So, to prevent data loss we recommend you save the data you wish to keep. Also keep in mind that it is not necessary to change the default configuration to start OpenShift.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc setup 
Before starting the machine, you need to keep in mind that it is not possible to make any changes to the virtual machine. For this tutorial however it is not necessary to change the configuration, if you don’t want to make any changes please continue by starting the machine with the crc start command.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc start 
\ it is possible that you will get a Nameserver error later on, if this is the case please start it with* crc start -n 1.1.1.1

Configuration

It is not is not necessary to change the default configuration and continue with this tutorial, this chapter is here for those that wish to do so and know what they are doing. However, for MacOS and Linux it is necessary to change the dns settings.

Configuring the CodeReady Containers

To start the configuration of the CodeReady Containers use the command crc config. This command allows you to configure the crc binary and the CodeReady virtual machine. The command has some requirements before it’s able to configure. This requirement is a subcommand, the available subcommands for this binary and virtual machine are:
get, this command allows you to see the values of a configurable property
set/unset, this command can be used for 2 things. To display the names of, or to set and/or unset values of several options and parameters. These parameters being:
○ Shell options
○ Shell attributes
○ Positional parameters
view, this command starts the configuration in read-only mode.
These commands need to operate on named configurable properties. To list all the available properties, you can run the command $crc config --help.
Throughout this manual we will use the $crc config command a few times to change some properties needed for the configuration.
There is also the possibility to use the crc config command to configure the behavior of the checks that’s done by the $crc start end $crc setup commands. By default, the startup checks will stop with the process if their conditions are not met. To bypass this potential issue, you can set the value of a property that starts with skip-check or warn-check to true to skip the check or warning instead of ending up with an error.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc config get C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc config set C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc config unset C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc config view C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc config --help 

Configuring the Virtual Machine

You can use the CPUs and memory properties to configure the default number of vCPU’s and amount of memory available for the virtual machine.
To increase the number of vCPU’s available to the virtual machine use the $crc config set CPUs . Keep in mind that the default number for the CPU’s is 4 and the number of vCPU’s you wish to assign must be equal or greater than the default value.
To increase the memory available to the virtual machine, use the $crc config set memory . Keep in mind that the default number for the memory is 9216 Mebibytes and the amount of memory you wish to assign must be equal or greater than the default value.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc config set CPUs  C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc config set memory > 

Configuring the DNS

Window / General DNS setup

There are two domain names used by the OpenShift cluster that are managed by the CodeReady Containers, these are:
crc.testing, this is the domain for the core OpenShift services.
apps-crc.testing, this is the domain used for accessing OpenShift applications that are deployed on the cluster.
Configuring the DNS settings in Windows is done by executing the crc setup. This command automatically adjusts the DNS configuration on the system. When executing crc start additional checks to verify the configuration will be executed.

macOS DNS setup

MacOS expects the following DNS configuration for the CodeReady Containers
● The CodeReady Containers creates a file that instructs the macOS to forward all DNS requests for the testing domain to the CodeReady Containers virtual machine. This file is created at /etc/resolvetesting.
● The oc binary requires the following CodeReady Containers entry to function properly, api.crc.testing adds an entry to /etc/hosts pointing at the VM IPaddress.

Linux DNS setup

CodeReady containers expect a slightly different DNS configuration. CodeReady Container expects the NetworkManager to manage networking. On Linux the NetworkManager uses dnsmasq through a configuration file, namely /etc/NetworkManageconf.d/crc-nm-dnsmasq.conf.
To set it up properly the dnsmasq instance has to forward the requests for crc.testing and apps-crc.testing domains to “192.168.130.11”. In the /etc/NetworkManageconf.d/crc-nm-dnsmasq.conf this will look like the following:
● Server=/crc. Testing/192.168.130.11
● Server=/apps-crc. Testing/192.168.130.11

Accessing the Openshift Cluster

Accessing the Openshift web console

To gain access to the OpenShift cluster running in the CodeReady virtual machine you need to make sure that the virtual machine is running before continuing with this chapter. The OpenShift clusters can be accessed through the OpenShift web console or the client binary(oc).
First you need to execute the $crc console command, this command will open your web browser and direct a tab to the web console. After that, you need to select the htpasswd_provider option in the OpenShift web console and log in as a developer user with the output provided by the crc start command.
It is also possible to view the password for kubeadmin and developer users by running the $crc console --credentials command. While you can access the cluster through the kubeadmin and developer users, it should be noted that the kubeadmin user should only be used for administrative tasks such as user management and the developer user for creating projects or OpenShift applications and the deployment of these applications.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc console C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc console --credentials 

Accessing the OpenShift cluster with oc

To gain access to the OpenShift cluster with the use of the oc command you need to complete several steps.
Step 1.
Execute the $crc oc-env command to print the command needed to add the cached oc binary to your PATH:
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc oc-env 
Step 2.
Execute the printed command. The output will look something like the following:
PS C:\Users\OpenShift> crc oc-env $Env:PATH = "CC:\Users\OpenShift\.crc\bin\oc;$Env:PATH" # Run this command to configure your shell: # & crc oc-env | Invoke-Expression 
This means we have to execute* the command that the output gives us, in this case that is:
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc oc-env | Invoke-Expression 
\this has to be executed every time you start; a solution is to move the oc binary to the same path as the crc binary*
To test if this step went correctly execute the following command, if it returns without errors oc is set up properly
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>.\oc 
Step 3
Now you need to login as a developer user, this can be done using the following command:
$oc login -u developer https://api.crc.testing:6443
Keep in mind that the $crc start will provide you with the password that is needed to login with the developer user.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>oc login -u developer https://api.crc.testing:6443 
Step 4
The oc can now be used to interact with your OpenShift cluster. If you for instance want to verify if the OpenShift cluster Operators are available, you can execute the command
$oc get co 
Keep in mind that by default the CodeReady Containers disables the functions provided by the commands $machine-config and $monitoringOperators.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>oc get co 

Demonstration

Now that you are able to access the cluster, we will take you on a tour through some of the possibilities within OpenShift Container Platform.
We will start by creating a project. Within this project we will import an image, and with this image we are going to build an application. After building the application we will explain how upscaling and downscaling can be used within the created application.
As the next step we will show the user how to make changes in the network route. We also show how monitoring can be used within the platform, however within the current version of CodeReady Containers this has been disabled.
Lastly, we will show the user how to use user management within the platform.

Creating a project

To be able to create a project within the console you have to login on the cluster. If you have not yet done this, this can be done by running the command crc console in the command line and logging in with the login data from before.
When you are logged in as admin, switch to Developer. If you're logged in as a developer, you don't have to switch. Switching between users can be done with the dropdown menu top left.
Now that you are properly logged in press the dropdown menu shown in the image below, from there click on create a project.
https://preview.redd.it/ytax8qocitv51.png?width=658&format=png&auto=webp&s=72d143733f545cf8731a3cca7cafa58c6507ace2
When you press the correct button, the following image will pop up. Here you can give your project a name and description. We chose to name it CodeReady with a displayname CodeReady Container.
https://preview.redd.it/vtaxadwditv51.png?width=594&format=png&auto=webp&s=e3b004bab39fb3b732d96198ed55fdd99259f210

Importing image

The Containers in OpenShift Container Platform are based on OCI or Docker formatted images. An image is a binary that contains everything needed to run a container as well as the metadata of the requirements needed for the container.
Within the OpenShift Container Platform it’s possible to obtain images in a number of ways. There is an integrated Docker registry that offers the possibility to download new images “on the fly”. In addition, OpenShift Container Platform can use third party registries such as:
- Https://hub.docker.com/
- Https://catalog.redhat.com/software/containers/search
Within this manual we are going to import an image from the Red Hat container catalog. In this example we’ll be using MediaWiki.
Search for the application in https://catalog.redhat.com/software/containers/search

https://preview.redd.it/c4mrbs0fitv51.png?width=672&format=png&auto=webp&s=f708f0542b53a9abf779be2d91d89cf09e9d2895
Navigate to “Get this image”
Follow the steps to “create a registry service account”, after that you can copy the YAML.
https://preview.redd.it/b4rrklqfitv51.png?width=1323&format=png&auto=webp&s=7a2eb14a3a1ba273b166e03e1410f06fd9ee1968
After the YAML has been copied we will go to the topology view and click on the YAML button
https://preview.redd.it/k3qzu8dgitv51.png?width=869&format=png&auto=webp&s=b1fefec67703d0a905b00765f0047fe7c6c0735b
Then we have to paste in the YAML, put in the name, namespace and your pull secret name (which you created through your registry account) and click on create.
https://preview.redd.it/iz48kltgitv51.png?width=781&format=png&auto=webp&s=4effc12e07bd294f64a326928804d9a931e4d2bd
Run the import command within powershell
$oc import-image openshift4/mediawiki --from=registry.redhat.io/openshift4/mediawiki --confirm imagestream.image.openshift.io/mediawiki imported 

Creating and managing an application

There are a few ways to create and manage applications. Within this demonstration we’ll show how to create an application from the previously imported image.

Creating the application

To create an image with the previously imported image go back to the console and topology. From here on select container image.
https://preview.redd.it/6506ea4iitv51.png?width=869&format=png&auto=webp&s=c0231d70bb16c76cd131e6b71256e93550cc8b37
For the option image you'll want to select the “image stream tag from internal registry” option. Give the application a name and then create the deployment.
https://preview.redd.it/tk72idniitv51.png?width=813&format=png&auto=webp&s=a4e662cf7b96604d84df9d04ab9b90b5436c803c
If everything went right during the creating process you should see the following, this means that the application is successfully running.
https://preview.redd.it/ovv9l85jitv51.png?width=901&format=png&auto=webp&s=f78f350207add0b8a979b6da931ff29ffa30128c

Scaling the application

In OpenShift there is a feature called autoscaling. There are two types of application scaling, namely vertical scaling, and horizontal scaling. Vertical scaling is adding only more CPU and hard disk and is no longer supported by OpenShift. Horizontal scaling is increasing the number of machines.
One of the ways to scale an application is by increasing the number of pods. This can be done by going to a pod within the view as seen in the previous step. By either pressing the up or down arrow more pods of the same application can be added. This is similar to horizontal scaling and can result in better performance when there are a lot of active users at the same time.
https://preview.redd.it/s6i1vbcrltv51.png?width=602&format=png&auto=webp&s=e62cbeeed116ba8c55704d61a990fc0d8f3cfaa1
In the picture above we see the number of nodes and pods and how many resources those nodes and pods are using. This is something to keep in mind if you want to scale up your application, the more you scale it up, the more resources it will take up.

https://preview.redd.it/quh037wmitv51.png?width=194&format=png&auto=webp&s=5e326647b223f3918c259b1602afa1b5fbbeea94

Network

Since OpenShift Container platform is built on Kubernetes it might be interesting to know some theory about its networking. Kubernetes, on which the OpenShift Container platform is built, ensures that the Pods within OpenShift can communicate with each other via the network and assigns them their own IP address. This makes all containers within the Pod behave as if they were on the same host. By giving each pod its own IP address, pods can be treated as physical hosts or virtual machines in terms of port mapping, networking, naming, service discovery, load balancing, application configuration and migration. To run multiple services such as front-end and back-end services, OpenShift Container Platform has a built-in DNS.
One of the changes that can be made to the networking of a Pod is the Route. We’ll show you how this can be done in this demonstration.
The Route is not the only thing that can be changed and or configured. Two other options that might be interesting but will not be demonstrated in this manual are:
- Ingress controller, Within OpenShift it is possible to set your own certificate. A user must have a certificate / key pair in PEM-encoded files, with the certificate signed by a trusted authority.
- Network policies, by default all pods in a project are accessible from other pods and network locations. To isolate one or more pods in a project, it is possible to create Network Policy objects in that project to indicate the allowed incoming connections. Project administrators can create and delete Network Policy objects within their own project.
There is a search function within the Container Platform. We’ll use this to search for the network routes and show how to add a new route.
https://preview.redd.it/8jkyhk8pitv51.png?width=769&format=png&auto=webp&s=9a8762df5bbae3d8a7c92db96b8cb70605a3d6da
You can add items that you use a lot to the navigation
https://preview.redd.it/t32sownqitv51.png?width=1598&format=png&auto=webp&s=6aab6f17bc9f871c591173493722eeae585a9232
For this example, we will add Routes to navigation.
https://preview.redd.it/pm3j7ljritv51.png?width=291&format=png&auto=webp&s=bc6fbda061afdd0780bbc72555d809b84a130b5b
Now that we’ve added Routes to the navigation, we can start the creation of the Route by clicking on “Create route”.
https://preview.redd.it/5lgecq0titv51.png?width=1603&format=png&auto=webp&s=d548789daaa6a8c7312a419393795b52da0e9f75
Fill in the name, select the service and the target port from the drop-down menu and click on Create.
https://preview.redd.it/qczgjc2uitv51.png?width=778&format=png&auto=webp&s=563f73f0dc548e3b5b2319ca97339e8f7b06c9d6
As you can see, we’ve successfully added the new route to our application.
https://preview.redd.it/gxfanp2vitv51.png?width=1588&format=png&auto=webp&s=1aae813d7ad0025f91013d884fcf62c5e7d109f1
Storage
OpenShift makes use of Persistent Storage, this type of storage uses persistent volume claims(PVC). PVC’s allow the developer to make persistent volumes without needing any knowledge about the underlying infrastructure.
Within this storage there are a few configuration options:
It is however important to know how to manually reclaim the persistent volumes, since if you delete PV the associated data will not be automatically deleted with it and therefore you cannot reassign the storage to another PV yet.
To manually reclaim the PV, you need to follow the following steps:
Step 1: Delete the PV, this can be done by executing the following command
$oc delete  
Step 2: Now you need to clean up the data on the associated storage asset
Step 3: Now you can delete the associated storage asset or if you with to reuse the same storage asset you can now create a PV with the storage asset definition.
It is also possible to directly change the reclaim policy within OpenShift, to do this you would need to follow the following steps:
Step 1: Get a list of the PVs in your cluster
$oc get pv 
This will give you a list of all the PV’s in your cluster and will display their following attributes: Name, Capacity, Accesmodes, Reclaimpolicy, Statusclaim, Storageclass, Reason and Age.
Step 2: Now choose the PV you wish to change and execute one of the following command’s, depending on your preferred policy:
$oc patch pv  -p '{"spec":{"persistentVolumeReclaimPolicy":"Retain"}}' 
In this example the reclaim policy will be changed to Retain.
$oc patch pv  -p '{"spec":{"persistentVolumeReclaimPolicy":"Recycle"}}' 
In this example the reclaim policy will be changed to Recycle.
$oc patch pv  -p '{"spec":{"persistentVolumeReclaimPolicy":"Delete"}}' 
In this example the reclaim policy will be changed to Delete.

Step 3: After this you can check the PV to verify the change by executing this command again:
$oc get pv 

Monitoring

Within Red Hat OpenShift there is the possibility to monitor the data that has been created by your containers, applications, and pods. To do so, click on the menu option in the top left corner. Check if you are logged in as Developer and click on “Monitoring”. Normally this function is not activated within the CodeReady containers, because it uses a lot of resources (Ram and CPU) to run.
https://preview.redd.it/an0wvn6zitv51.png?width=228&format=png&auto=webp&s=51abf8cc31bd763deb457d49514f99ee81d610ec
Once you have activated “Monitoring” you can change the “Time Range” and “Refresh Interval” in the top right corner of your screen. This will change the monitoring data on your screen.
https://preview.redd.it/e0yvzsh1jtv51.png?width=493&format=png&auto=webp&s=b2c563635cfa60ea7ce2f9c146aa994df6aa1c34
Within this function you can also monitor “Events”. These events are records of important information and are useful for monitoring and troubleshooting within the OpenShift Container Platform.
https://preview.redd.it/l90vkmp3jtv51.png?width=602&format=png&auto=webp&s=4e97f14bedaec7ededcdcda96e7823f77ced24c2

User management

According to the documentation of OpenShift is a user, an entity that interacts with the OpenShift Container Platform API. These can be a developer for developing applications or an administrator for managing the cluster. Users can be assigned to groups, which set the permissions applied to all the group’s members. For example, you can give API access to a group, which gives all members of the group API access.
There are multiple ways to create a user depending on the configured identity provider. The DenyAll identity provider is the default within OpenShift Container Platform. This default denies access for all the usernames and passwords.
First, we’re going to create a new user, the way this is done depends on the identity provider, this depends on the mapping method used as part of the identity provider configuration.
for more information on what mapping methods are and how they function:
https://docs.openshift.com/enterprise/3.1/install_config/configuring_authentication.html
With the default mapping method, the steps will be as following
$oc create user  
Next up, we’ll create an OpenShift Container Platform Identity. Use the name of the identity provider and the name that uniquely represents this identity in the scope of the identity provider:
$oc create identity : 
The is the name of the identity provider in the master configuration. For example, the following commands create an Identity with identity provider ldap_provider and the identity provider username mediawiki_s.
$oc create identity ldap_provider:mediawiki_s 
Create a useidentity mapping for the created user and identity:
$oc create useridentitymapping :  
For example, the following command maps the identity to the user:
$oc create useridentitymapping ldap_provider:mediawiki_s mediawiki 
Now were going to assign a role to this new user, this can be done by executing the following command:
$oc create clusterrolebinding  \ --clusterrole= --user= 
There is a --clusterrole option that can be used to give the user a specific role, like a cluster user with admin privileges. The cluster admin has access to all files and is able to manage the access level of other users.
Below is an example of the admin clusterrole command:
$oc create clusterrolebinding registry-controller \ --clusterrole=cluster-admin --user=admin 

What did you achieve?

If you followed all the steps within this manual you now should have a functioning Mediawiki Application running on your own CodeReady Containers. During the installation of this application on CodeReady Containers you have learned how to do the following things:
● Installing the CodeReady Containers
● Updating OpenShift
● Configuring a CodeReady Container
● Configuring the DNS
● Accessing the OpenShift cluster
● Deploying an application
● Creating new users
With these skills you’ll be able to set up your own Container Platform environment and host applications of your choosing.

Troubleshooting

Nameserver
There is the possibility that your CodeReady container can't connect to the internet due to a Nameserver error. When this is encountered a working fix for us was to stop the machine and then start the CRC machine with the following command:
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc start -n 1.1.1.1 
Hyper-V admin
Should you run into a problem with Hyper-V it might be because your user is not an admin and therefore can’t access the Hyper-V admin user group.
  1. Click Start > Control Panel > Administration Tools > Computer Management. The Computer Management window opens.
  2. Click System Tools > Local Users and Groups > Groups. The list of groups opens.
  3. Double-click the Hyper-V Administrators group. The Hyper-V Administrators Properties window opens.
  4. Click Add. The Select Users or Groups window opens.
  5. In the Enter the object names to select field, enter the user account name to whom you want to assign permissions, and then click OK.
  6. Click Apply, and then click OK.

Terms and definitions

These terms and definitions will be expanded upon, below you can see an example of how this is going to look like together with a few terms that will require definitions.
Kubernetes is an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. Openshift is based on Kubernetes.
Clusters are a collection of multiple nodes which communicate with each other to perform a set of operations.
Containers are the basic units of OpenShift applications. These container technologies are lightweight mechanisms for isolating running processes so that they are limited to interacting with only their designated resources.
CodeReady Container is a minimal, preconfigured cluster that is used for development and testing purposes.
CodeReady Workspaces uses Kubernetes and containers to provide any member of the development or IT team with a consistent, secure, and zero-configuration development environment.

Sources

  1. https://www.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenteen/SSMKFH/com.ibm.apmaas.doc/install/hyperv_config_add_nonadmin_user_hyperv_usergroup.html
  2. https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-us/openshift_container_platform/4.5/
  3. https://docs.openshift.com/container-platform/3.11/admin_guide/manage_users.html
submitted by Groep6HHS to openshift [link] [comments]

Non-linear stretch and update on the open-source gyro-assisted video stabilization project

Hey everyone. You might remember this post from around a month ago about developing a program that can use Betaflight blackbox data for stabilizing FPV footage similar to Reelsteady. Here's an update on the project.
TL;DR: Stabilization doesn't work yet but I'm slowly getting there. The code so far can be found on this Github Repo, which currently contains working code for a camera calibration utility and a utility for non-linear stretching (superview-like) of 4:3 video to 16:9. I've made a binary available for download with the current features.
So yeah… In the last post I used some low-resolution DVR footage for doing a proof of concept using a quick and dirty Blender project. In that post I naively thought that synchronizing gyro data with the footage wouldn't be too difficult. After getting access to some test footage (thanks to agent_d00nut, kyleli, and muteFPV!), and finding some example GoPro footage online, I've come to realize that perfect synchronization is absolutely critical. An offset of a couple of frames can exaggerate camera shake instead of removing it (this wasn't noticeable in the DVR). Moreover, logging rates aren't perfectly accurate, so matching a single point between footage and gyro data isn't enough. Doing this manually is extremely tedious.
This example took around an hour of tweaking to get a decent synchronization. The way forward is thus automatic synchronization. It also turns out that lens correction and calibration is required for proper and seamless stabilization. For instance, the result of wide-angle lens tilted 10 degrees will look nothing a zoom lens tilted the same amount. This also explains the wobbling in the example video.
During my research about video stabilization methods I found his paper by Karpenko et al. detailing a method of doing video stabilization and rolling shutter correction using gyroscopes with some very concise MATLAB code. While not exactly a step by step tutorial for beginners as I had jokingly hoped, I was still able to gather the overall ideas. The paper served as a springboard for further research, which lead me to learning and reading about quaternions, SLERP, camera matrices, image projections etc.
Instead of Blender, I have moved over to using OpenCV and Python for image processing, and Pyside2 for UI. OpenCV is used for computer vision and contains a bunch of features for video analysis and image processing. I'm just using Python since that's what I'm most familiar with. Hopefully, performance isn't too big of an issue since both OpenCV and Numpy are designed to be fast.
Here's what I've worked on since the last post:
All of this can be found in the Github repository. Feel free to take a peek, I've tried to keep the code nice and readable.
The plan moving forward is to focus on developing a working stabilization program for GoPro footage with embedded gyro metadata. This is something we know can work from reelsteady. Afterwards, support for blackbox log can be implemented, which should in theory just be a coordinate transformation to account for camera orientation and uptilt from what I can tell. If only the former works, at least there will be a (probably inferior) open source alternative to Reelsteady :).
My current plan for the gyro synchronization is to use the included optical flow functions in OpenCV to estimate camera movement, and "slide" the gyro data around until the difference is minimized, similar to the way Karpenko et al. does it. Doing this at two separate points in the video should be enough to compute clock offsets and get the best fit.
When the synchronization works, a low pass filter can be used to create a smooth virtual camera. A perspective transformation of the image plane can then be used to match the difference between the real and virtual camera. The image plane will essentially be "rotated" to match how it would look from the virtual camera, if that makes sense (more detail in the paper linked above for anyone interested). This virtual rotation only works with undistorted footage, hence the need for lens calibration. Another thing which may or may not be an issue is rolling shutter correction, but that'll have to wait until the other stuff works.
Some people asked for it last time, so I added a donate button on the Github page. You can throw a couple of bucks my way if you want (maybe that'll justify me getting a action camera myself for testing :) ), but be warned: While I'm optimistic, it's still not 100% certain that it will work with blackbox data as envisioned. GoPro metadata will probably work as mentioned before. Also, I've been kinda busy preparing for moving out/starting at uni next month, but I'll try to work on the project whenever I'm not procrastinating.
submitted by EC171 to Multicopter [link] [comments]

[ANN][ANDROID MINING][AIRDROP] NewEnglandcoin: Scrypt RandomSpike

New England
New England 6 States Songs: https://www.reddit.com/newengland/comments/er8wxd/new_england_6_states_songs/
NewEnglandcoin
Symbol: NENG
NewEnglandcoin is a clone of Bitcoin using scrypt as a proof-of-work algorithm with enhanced features to protect against 51% attack and decentralize on mining to allow diversified mining rigs across CPUs, GPUs, ASICs and Android phones.
Mining Algorithm: Scrypt with RandomSpike. RandomSpike is 3rd generation of Dynamic Difficulty (DynDiff) algorithm on top of scrypt.
1 minute block targets base difficulty reset: every 1440 blocks subsidy halves in 2.1m blocks (~ 2 to 4 years) 84,000,000,000 total maximum NENG 20000 NENG per block Pre-mine: 1% - reserved for dev fund ICO: None RPCPort: 6376 Port: 6377
NewEnglandcoin has dogecoin like supply at 84 billion maximum NENG. This huge supply insures that NENG is suitable for retail transactions and daily use. The inflation schedule of NengEnglandcoin is actually identical to that of Litecoin. Bitcoin and Litecoin are already proven to be great long term store of value. The Litecoin-like NENG inflation schedule will make NewEnglandcoin ideal for long term investment appreciation as the supply is limited and capped at a fixed number
Bitcoin Fork - Suitable for Home Hobbyists
NewEnglandcoin core wallet continues to maintain version tag of "Satoshi v0.8.7.5" because NewEnglandcoin is very much an exact clone of bitcoin plus some mining feature changes with DynDiff algorithm. NewEnglandcoin is very suitable as lite version of bitcoin for educational purpose on desktop mining, full node running and bitcoin programming using bitcoin-json APIs.
The NewEnglandcoin (NENG) mining algorithm original upgrade ideas were mainly designed for decentralization of mining rigs on scrypt, which is same algo as litecoin/dogecoin. The way it is going now is that NENG is very suitable for bitcoin/litecoin/dogecoin hobbyists who can not , will not spend huge money to run noisy ASIC/GPU mining equipments, but still want to mine NENG at home with quiet simple CPU/GPU or with a cheap ASIC like FutureBit Moonlander 2 USB or Apollo pod on solo mining setup to obtain very decent profitable results. NENG allows bitcoin litecoin hobbyists to experience full node running, solo mining, CPU/GPU/ASIC for a fun experience at home at cheap cost without breaking bank on equipment or electricity.
MIT Free Course - 23 lectures about Bitcoin, Blockchain and Finance (Fall,2018)
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63UUkfL0onkxF6MYgVa04Fn
CPU Minable Coin Because of dynamic difficulty algorithm on top of scrypt, NewEnglandcoin is CPU Minable. Users can easily set up full node for mining at Home PC or Mac using our dedicated cheetah software.
Research on the first forked 50 blocks on v1.2.0 core confirmed that ASIC/GPU miners mined 66% of 50 blocks, CPU miners mined the remaining 34%.
NENG v1.4.0 release enabled CPU mining inside android phones.
Youtube Video Tutorial
How to CPU Mine NewEnglandcoin (NENG) in Windows 10 Part 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdOoPvAjzlE How to CPU Mine NewEnglandcoin (NENG) in Windows 10 Part 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHnRJvJRzZg
How to CPU Mine NewEnglandcoin (NENG) in macOS https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zj7NLMeNSOQ
Decentralization and Community Driven NewEnglandcoin is a decentralized coin just like bitcoin. There is no boss on NewEnglandcoin. Nobody nor the dev owns NENG.
We know a coin is worth nothing if there is no backing from community. Therefore, we as dev do not intend to make decision on this coin solely by ourselves. It is our expectation that NewEnglandcoin community will make majority of decisions on direction of this coin from now on. We as dev merely view our-self as coin creater and technical support of this coin while providing NENG a permanent home at ShorelineCrypto Exchange.
Twitter Airdrop
Follow NENG twitter and receive 100,000 NENG on Twitter Airdrop to up to 1000 winners
Graphic Redesign Bounty
Top one award: 90.9 million NENG Top 10 Winners: 500,000 NENG / person Event Timing: March 25, 2019 - Present Event Address: NewEnglandcoin DISCORD at: https://discord.gg/UPeBwgs
Please complete above Twitter Bounty requirement first. Then follow Below Steps to qualify for the Bounty: (1) Required: submit your own designed NENG logo picture in gif, png jpg or any other common graphic file format into DISCORD "bounty-submission" board (2) Optional: submit a second graphic for logo or any other marketing purposes into "bounty-submission" board. (3) Complete below form.
Please limit your submission to no more than two total. Delete any wrongly submitted or undesired graphics in the board. Contact DISCORD u/honglu69#5911 or u/krypton#6139 if you have any issues.
Twitter Airdrop/Graphic Redesign bounty sign up: https://goo.gl/forms/L0vcwmVi8c76cR7m1
Milestones
Roadmap
NENG v1.4.0 Android Mining, randomSpike Evaluation https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/download/NENG_2020_Q3_report/NENG_2020_Q3_report.pdf
RandomSpike - NENG core v1.3.0 Hardfork Upgrade Proposal https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/download/2020Q1_Report/Scrypt_RandomSpike_NENGv1.3.0_Hardfork_Proposal.pdf
NENG Security, Decentralization & Valuation
https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/download/2019Q2_report/NENG_Security_Decentralization_Value.pdf
Whitepaper v1.0 https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/download/whitepaper_v1.0/NENG_WhitePaper.pdf
DISCORD https://discord.gg/UPeBwgs
Explorer
http://www.findblocks.com/exploreNENG http://86.100.49.209/exploreNENG http://nengexplorer.mooo.com:3001/
Step by step guide on how to setup an explorer: https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/nengexplorer
Github https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin
Wallet
Android with UserLand App (arm64/armhf), Chromebook (x64/arm64/armhf): https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/tag/v1.4.0.5
Linux Wallet (Ubuntu/Linux Mint, Debian/MX Linux, Arch/Manjaro, Fedora, openSUSE): https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/tag/v1.4.0.3
MacOS Wallet (10.11 El Capitan or higher): https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/tag/v1.4.0.2
Android with GNUroot on 32 bits old Phones (alpha release) wallet: https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/tag/v1.4.0
Windows wallet: https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/tag/v1.3.0.1
addnode ip address for the wallet to sync faster, frequently updated conf file: https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/cheetah_cpumineblob/mastenewenglandcoin.conf-example
How to Sync Full Node Desktop Wallet https://www.reddit.com/NewEnglandCoin/comments/er6f0q/how_to_sync_full_node_desktop_wallet/
TWITTER https://twitter.com/newenglandcoin
REDDIT https://www.reddit.com/NewEnglandCoin/
Cheetah CPU Miner Software https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/cheetah_cpuminer
Solo Mining with GPU or ASIC https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg52187727#msg52187727
How to Run Two Full Node in Same Desktop PC https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg53581449#msg53581449
ASIC/GPU Mining Pools Warning to Big ASIC Miners Due to DynDiff Algo on top of Scrypt, solo mining is recommended for ASIC/GPU miners. Further more, even for mining pools, small mining pool will generate better performance than big NENG mining pool because of new algo v1.2.x post hard fork.
The set up configuration of NENG for scrypt pool mining is same as a typical normal scrypt coin. In other word, DynDiff on Scrypt algo is backward compatible with Scrypt algo. Because ASIC/GPU miners rely on CPU miners for smooth blockchain movement, checkout bottom of "Latest News" section for A WARNING to All ASIC miners before you decide to dump big ASIC hash rate into NENG mining.
(1) Original DynDiff Warning: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg48324708#msg48324708 (2) New Warning on RandomSpike Spike difficulty (244k) introduced in RandomSpike served as roadblocks to instant mining and provide security against 51% attack risk. However, this spike difficulty like a roadblock that makes big ASIC mining less profitable. In case of spike block to be mined, the spike difficulty immediately serve as base difficulty, which will block GPU/ASIC miners effectively and leave CPU cheetah solo miners dominating mining almost 100% until next base difficulty reset.
FindBlocks http://findblocks.com/
CRpool http://crpool.xyz/
Cminors' Pool http://newenglandcoin.cminors-pool.com/
SPOOL https://spools.online/
Exchange
📷
https://shorelinecrypto.com/
Features: anonymous sign up and trading. No restriction or limit on deposit or withdraw.
The trading pairs available: NewEnglandcoin (NENG) / Dogecoin (DOGE)
Trading commission: A round trip trading will incur 0.10% trading fees in average. Fees are paid only on buyer side. buy fee: 0.2% / sell fee: 0% Deposit fees: free for all coins Withdraw fees: ZERO per withdraw. Mining fees are appointed by each coin blockchain. To cover the blockchain mining fees, there is minimum balance per coin per account: * Dogecoin 2 DOGE * NewEnglandcoin 1 NENG
Latest News Aug 30, 2020 - NENG v1.4.0.5 Released for Android/Chromebook Upgrade with armhf, better hardware support https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg55098029#msg55098029
Aug 11, 2020 - NENG v1.4.0.4 Released for Android arm64 Upgrade / Chromebook Support https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54977437#msg54977437
Jul 30, 2020 - NENG v1.4.0.3 Released for Linux Wallet Upgrade with 8 Distros https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54898540#msg54898540
Jul 21, 2020 - NENG v1.4.0.2 Released for MacOS Upgrade with Catalina https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54839522#msg54839522
Jul 19, 2020 - NENG v1.4.0.1 Released for MacOS Wallet Upgrade https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54830333#msg54830333
Jul 15, 2020 - NENG v1.4.0 Released for Android Mining, Ubuntu 20.04 support https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54803639#msg54803639
Jul 11, 2020 - NENG v1.4.0 Android Mining, randomSpike Evaluation https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54777222#msg54777222
Jun 27, 2020 - Pre-Announce: NENG v1.4.0 Proposal for Mobile Miner Upgrade, Android Mining Start in July 2020 https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54694233#msg54694233
Jun 19, 2020 - Best Practice for Futurebit Moonlander2 USB ASIC on solo mining mode https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54645726#msg54645726
Mar 15, 2020 - Scrypt RandomSpike - NENG v1.3.0.1 Released for better wallet syncing https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54030923#msg54030923
Feb 23, 2020 - Scrypt RandomSpike - NENG Core v1.3.0 Relased, Hardfork on Mar 1 https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg53900926#msg53900926
Feb 1, 2020 - Scrypt RandomSpike Proposal Published- NENG 1.3.0 Hardfork https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg53735458#msg53735458
Jan 15, 2020 - NewEnglandcoin Dev Team Expanded with New Kickoff https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg53617358#msg53617358
Jan 12, 2020 - Explanation of Base Diff Reset and Effect of Supply https://www.reddit.com/NewEnglandCoin/comments/envmo1/explanation_of_base_diff_reset_and_effect_of/
Dec 19, 2019 - Shoreline_tradingbot version 1.0 is released https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5121953.msg53391184#msg53391184
Sept 1, 2019 - NewEnglandcoin (NENG) is Selected as Shoreline Tradingbot First Supported Coin https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg52331201#msg52331201
Aug 15, 2019 - Mining Update on Effect of Base Difficulty Reset, GPU vs ASIC https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg52169572#msg52169572
Jul 7, 2019 - CPU Mining on macOS Mojave is supported under latest Cheetah_Cpuminer Release https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg51745839#msg51745839
Jun 1, 2019 - NENG Fiat project is stopped by Square, Inc https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg51312291#msg51312291
Apr 21, 2019 - NENG Fiat Project is Launched by ShorelineCrypto https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg50714764#msg50714764
Apr 7, 2019 - Announcement of Fiat Project for all U.S. Residents & Mobile Miner Project Initiation https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg50506585#msg50506585
Apr 1, 2019 - Disclosure on Large Buying on NENG at ShorelineCrypto Exchange https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg50417196#msg50417196
Mar 27, 2019 - Disclosure on Large Buying on NENG at ShorelineCrypto Exchange https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg50332097#msg50332097
Mar 17, 2019 - Disclosure on Large Buying on NENG at ShorelineCrypto Exchange https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg50208194#msg50208194
Feb 26, 2019 - Community Project - NewEnglandcoin Graphic Redesign Bounty Initiated https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg49931305#msg49931305
Feb 22, 2019 - Dev Policy on Checkpoints on NewEnglandcoin https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg49875242#msg49875242
Feb 20, 2019 - NewEnglandCoin v1.2.1 Released to Secure the Hard Kork https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg49831059#msg49831059
Feb 11, 2019 - NewEnglandCoin v1.2.0 Released, Anti-51% Attack, Anti-instant Mining after Hard Fork https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg49685389#msg49685389
Jan 13, 2019 - Cheetah_CpuMiner added support for CPU Mining on Mac https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg49218760#msg49218760
Jan 12, 2019 - NENG Core v1.1.2 Released to support MacOS OSX Wallet https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg49202088#msg49202088
Jan 2, 2019 - Cheetah_Cpuminer v1.1.0 is released for both Linux and Windows https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg49004345#msg49004345
Dec 31, 2018 - Technical Whitepaper is Released https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg48990334#msg48990334
Dec 28, 2018 - Cheetah_Cpuminer v1.0.0 is released for Linux https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg48935135#msg48935135
Update on Dec 14, 2018 - NENG Blockchain Stuck Issue https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg48668375#msg48668375
Nov 27, 2018 - Exclusive for PC CPU Miners - How to Steal a Block from ASIC Miners https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg48258465#msg48258465
Nov 28, 2018 - How to CPU Mine a NENG block with window/linux PC https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg48298311#msg48298311
Nov 29, 2018 - A Warning to ASIC Miners https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg48324708#msg48324708
Disclosure: Dev Team Came from ShorelineCrypto, a US based Informatics Service Business offering Fee for service for Coin Creation, Coin Exchange Listing, Blockchain Consulting, etc.
submitted by honglu69 to NewEnglandCoin [link] [comments]

Step-by-Step Guide for Adding a Stack, Expanding Control Lines, and Building an Assembler

After the positive response to my first tutorial on expanding the RAM, I thought I'd continue the fun by expanding the capabilities of Ben's 8-bit CPU even further. That said, you'll need to have done the work in the previous post to be able to do this. You can get a sense for what we'll do in this Imgur gallery.
In this tutorial, we'll balance software and hardware improvements to make this a pretty capable machine:

Parts List

To only update the hardware, you'll need:
If you want to update the toolchain, you'll need:
  1. Arduino Mega 2560 (Amazon) to create the programmer.
  2. Ribbon Jumper Cables (Amazon) to connect the Arduino to the breadboard.
  3. TL866 II Plus EEPROM Programmer (Amazon) to program the ROM.
Bonus Clock Improvement: One additional thing I did is replace the 74LS04 inverter in Ben's clock circuit with a 74LS14 inverting Schmitt trigger (datasheet, Jameco). The pinouts are identical! Just drop it in, wire the existing lines, and then run the clock output through it twice (since it's inverting) to get a squeaky clean clock signal. Useful if you want to go even faster with the CPU.

Step 1: Program with an Arduino and Assembler (Image 1, Image 2)

There's a certain delight in the physical programming of a computer with switches. This is how Bill Gates and Paul Allen famously programmed the Altair 8800 and started Microsoft. But at some point, the hardware becomes limited by how effectively you can input the software. After upgrading the RAM, I quickly felt constrained by how long it took to program everything.
You can continue to program the computer physically if you want and even after upgrading that option is still available, so this step is optional. There's probably many ways to approach the programming, but this way felt simple and in the spirit of the build. We'll use an Arduino Mega 2560, like the one in Ben's 6502 build, to program the RAM. We'll start with a homemade assembler then switch to something more robust.
Preparing the Physical Interface
The first thing to do is prepare the CPU to be programmed by the Arduino. We already did the hard work on this in the RAM upgrade tutorial by using the bus to write to the RAM and disconnecting the control ROM while in program mode. Now we just need to route the appropriate lines to a convenient spot on the board to plug the Arduino into.
  1. This is optional, but I rewired all the DIP switches to have ground on one side, rather than alternating sides like Ben's build. This just makes it easier to route wires.
  2. Wire the 8 address lines from the DIP switch, connecting the side opposite to ground (the one going to the chips) to a convenient point on the board. I put them on the far left, next to the address LEDs and above the write button circuit.
  3. Wire the 8 data lines from the DIP switch, connecting the side opposite to ground (the one going to the chips) directly below the address lines. Make sure they're separated by the gutter so they're not connected.
  4. Wire a line from the write button to your input area. You want to connect the side of the button that's not connected to ground (the one going to the chip).
So now you have one convenient spot with 8 address lines, 8 data lines, and a write line. If you want to get fancy, you can wire them into some kind of connector, but I found that ribbon jumper cables work nicely and keep things tidy.
The way we'll program the RAM is to enter program mode and set all the DIP switches to the high position (e.g., 11111111). Since the switches are upside-down, this means they'll all be disconnected and not driving to ground. The address and write lines will simply be floating and the data lines will be weakly pulled up by 1k resistors. Either way, the Arduino can now drive the signals going into the chips using its outputs.
Creating the Arduino Programmer
Now that we can interface with an Arduino, we need to write some software. If you follow Ben's 6502 video, you'll have all the knowledge you need to get this working. If you want some hints and code, see below (source code):
  1. Create arrays for your data and address lines. For example: const char ADDRESS_LINES[] = {39, 41, 43, 45, 47, 49, 51, 53};. Create your write line with #define RAM_WRITE 3.
  2. Create functions to enable and disable your address and data lines. You want to enable them before writing. Make sure to disable them afterward so that you can still manually program using DIP switches without disconnecting the Arduino. The code looks like this (just change INPUT to OUTPUT accordingly): for(int n = 0; n < 8; n += 1) { pinMode(ADDRESS_LINES[n], OUTPUT); }
  3. Create a function to write to an address. It'll look like void writeData(byte writeAddress, byte writeData) and basically use two loops, one for address and one for data, followed by toggling the write.
  4. Create a char array that contains your program and data. You can use #define to create opcodes like #define LDA 0x01.
  5. In your main function, loop through the program array and send it through writeData.
With this setup, you can now load multi-line programs in a fraction of a second! This can really come in handy with debugging by stress testing your CPU with software. Make sure to test your setup with existing programs you know run reliably. Now that you have your basic setup working, you can add 8 additional lines to read the bus and expand the program to let you read memory locations or even monitor the running of your CPU.
Making an Assembler
The above will serve us well but it's missing a key feature: labels. Labels are invaluable in assembly because they're so versatile. Jumps, subroutines, variables all use labels. The problem is that labels require parsing. Parsing is a fun project on the road to a compiler but not something I wanted to delve into right now--if you're interested, you can learn about Flex and Bison. Instead, I found a custom assembler that lets you define your CPU's instruction set and it'll do everything else for you. Let's get it setup:
  1. If you're on Windows, you can use the pre-built binaries. Otherwise, you'll need to install Rust and compile via cargo build.
  2. Create a file called 8bit.cpu and define your CPU instructions (source code). For example, LDA would be lda {address} -> 0x01 @ address[7:0]. What's cool is you can also now create the instruction's immediate variant instead of having to call it LDI: lda #{value} -> 0x05 @ value[7:0].
  3. You can now write assembly by adding #include "8bit.cpu" to the top of your code. There's a lot of neat features so make sure to read the documentation!
  4. Once you've written some assembly, you can generate the machine code using ./customasm yourprogram.s -f hexc -p. This prints out a char array just like our Arduino program used!
  5. Copy the char array into your Arduino program and send it to your CPU.
At this stage, you can start creating some pretty complex programs with ease. I would definitely play around with writing some larger programs. I actually found a bug in my hardware that was hidden for a while because my programs were never very complex!

Step 2: Expand the Control Lines (Image)

Before we can expand the CPU any further, we have to address the fact we're running out of control lines. An easy way to do this is to add a 3rd 28C16 ROM and be on your way. If you want something a little more involved but satisfying, read on.
Right now the control lines are one hot encoded. This means that if you have 4 lines, you can encode 4 states. But we know that a 4-bit binary number can encode 16 states. We'll use this principle via 74LS138 decoders, just like Ben used for the step counter.
Choosing the Control Line Combinations
Everything comes with trade-offs. In the case of combining control lines, it means the two control lines we choose to combine can never be activated at the same time. We can ensure this by encoding all the inputs together in the first 74LS138 and all the outputs together in a second 74LS138. We'll keep the remaining control lines directly connected.
Rewiring the Control Lines
If your build is anything like mine, the control lines are a bit of a mess. You'll need to be careful when rewiring to ensure it all comes back together correctly. Let's get to it:
  1. Place the two 74LS138 decoders on the far right side of the breadboard with the ROMs. Connect them to power and ground.
  2. You'll likely run out of inverters, so place a 74LS04 on the breadboard above your decoders. Connect it to power and ground.
  3. Carefully take your inputs (MI, RI, II, AI, BI, J) and wire them to the outputs of the left 74LS138. Do not wire anything to O0 because that's activated by 000 which won't work for us!
  4. Carefully take your outputs (RO, CO, AO, EO) and wire them to the outputs of the right 74LS138. Remember, do not wire anything to O0!
  5. Now, the 74LS138 outputs are active low, but the ROM outputs were active high. This means you need to swap the wiring on all your existing 74LS04 inverters for the LEDs and control lines to work. Make sure you track which control lines are supposed to be active high vs. active low!
  6. Wire E3 to power and E2 to ground. Connect the E1 on both 138s together, then connect it to the same line as OE on your ROMs. This will ensure that the outputs are disabled when you're in program mode. You can actually take off the 1k pull-up resistors from the previous tutorial at this stage, because the 138s actively drive the lines going to the 74LS04 inverters rather than floating like the ROMs.
At this point, you really need to ensure that the massive rewiring job was successful. Connect 3 jumper wires to A0-A2 and test all the combinations manually. Make sure the correct LED lights up and check with a multimeteoscilloscope that you're getting the right signal at each chip. Catching mistakes at this point will save you a lot of headaches! Now that everything is working, let's finish up:
  1. Connect A0-A2 of the left 74LS138 to the left ROM's A0-A2.
  2. Connect A0-A2 of the right 74LS138 to the right ROM's A0-A2.
  3. Distribute the rest of the control signals across the two ROMs.
Changing the ROM Code
This part is easy. We just need to update all of our #define with the new addresses and program the ROMs again. For clarity that we're not using one-hot encoding anymore, I recommend using hex instead of binary. So instead of #define MI 0b0000000100000000, we can use #define MI 0x0100, #define RI 0x0200, and so on.
Testing
Expanding the control lines required physically rewiring a lot of critical stuff, so small mistakes can creep up and make mysterious errors down the road. Write a program that activates each control line at least once and make sure it works properly! With your assembler and Arduino programmer, this should be trivial.
Bonus: Adding B Register Output
With the additional control lines, don't forget you can now add a BO signal easily which lets you fully use the B register.

Step 3: Add a Stack (Image 1, Image 2)

Adding a stack significantly expands the capability of the CPU. It enables subroutines, recursion, and handling interrupts (with some additional logic). We'll create our stack with an 8-bit stack pointer hard-coded from $0100 to $01FF, just like the 6502.
Wiring up the Stack Pointer
A stack pointer is conceptually similar to a program counter. It stores an address, you can read it and write to it, and it increments. The only difference between a stack pointer and a program counter is that the stack pointer must also decrement. To create our stack pointer, we'll use two 74LS193 4-bit up/down binary counters:
  1. Place a 74LS00 NAND gate, 74LS245 transceiver, and two 74LS193 counters in a row next to your output register. Wire up power and ground.
  2. Wire the the Carry output of the right 193 to the Count Up input of the left 193. Do the same for the Borrow output and Count Down input.
  3. Connect the Clear input between the two 193s and with an active high reset line. The B register has one you can use on its 74LS173s.
  4. Connect the Load input between the two 193s and to a new active low control line called SI on your 74LS138 decoder.
  5. Connect the QA-QD outputs of the lower counter to A8-A5 and the upper counter to A4-A1. Pay special attention because the output are in a weird order (BACD) and you want to make sure the lower A is connected to A8 and the upper A is connected to A4.
  6. Connect the A-D inputs of the lower counter to B8-B5 and the upper counter to B4-B1. Again, the inputs are in a weird order and on both sides of the chip so pay special attention.
  7. Connect the B1-B8 outputs of the 74LS245 transceiver to the bus.
  8. On the 74LS245 transceiver, connect DIR to power (high) and connect OE to a new active low control line called SO on your 74LS138 decoder.
  9. Add 8 LEDs and resistors to the lower part of the 74LS245 transceiver (A1-A8) so you can see what's going on with the stack pointer.
Enabling Increment & Decrement
We've now connected everything but the Count Up and Count Down inputs. The way the 74LS193 works is that if nothing is counting, both inputs are high. If you want to increment, you keep Count Down high and pulse Count Up. To decrement, you do the opposite. We'll use a 74LS00 NAND gate for this:
  1. Take the clock from the 74LS08 AND gate and make it an input into two different NAND gates on the 74LS00.
  2. Take the output from one NAND gate and wire it to the Count Up input on the lower 74LS193 counter. Take the other output and wire it to the Count Down input.
  3. Wire up a new active high control line called SP from your ROM to the NAND gate going into Count Up.
  4. Wire up a new active high control line called SM from your ROM to the NAND gate going into Count Down.
At this point, everything should be working. Your counter should be able to reset, input a value, output a value, and increment/decrement. But the issue is it'll be writing to $0000 to $00FF in the RAM! Let's fix that.
Accessing Higher Memory Addresses
We need the stack to be in a different place in memory than our regular program. The problem is, we only have an 8-bit bus, so how do we tell the RAM we want a higher address? We'll use a special control line to do this:
  1. Wire up an active high line called SA from the 28C16 ROM to A8 on the Cypress CY7C199 RAM.
  2. Add an LED and resistor so you can see when the stack is active.
That's it! Now, whenever we need the stack we can use a combination of the control line and stack pointer to access $0100 to $01FF.
Updating the Instruction Set
All that's left now is to create some instructions that utilize the stack. We'll need to settle some conventions before we begin:
If you want to add a little personal flair to your design, you can change the convention fairly easily. Let's implement push and pop (source code):
  1. Define all your new control lines, such as #define SI 0x0700 and #define SO 0x0005.
  2. Create two new instructions: PSH (1011) and POP (1100).
  3. PSH starts the same as any other for the first two steps: MI|CO and RO|II|CE. The next step is to put the contents of the stack pointer into the address register via MI|SO|SA. Recall that SA is the special control line that tells the memory to access the $01XX bank rather than $00XX.
  4. We then take the contents of AO and write it into the RAM. We can also increment the stack pointer at this stage. All of this is done via: AO|RI|SP|SA, followed by TR.
  5. POP is pretty similar. Start off with MI|CO and RO|II|CE. We then need to take a cycle and decrement the stack pointer with SM. Like with PSH, we then set the address register with MI|SO|SA.
  6. We now just need to output the RAM into our A register with RO|AI|SA and then end the instruction with TR.
  7. Updating the assembler is easy since neither instruction has operands. For example, push is just psh -> 0x0B.
And that's it! Write some programs that take advantage of your new 256 byte stack to make sure everything works as expected.

Step 4: Add Subroutine Instructions (Image)

The last step to complete our stack is to add subroutine instructions. This allows us to write complex programs and paves the way for things like interrupt handling.
Subroutines are like a blend of push/pop instructions and a jump. Basically, when you want to call a subroutine, you save your spot in the program by pushing the program counter onto the stack, then jumping to the subroutine's location in memory. When you're done with the subroutine, you simply pop the program counter value from the stack and jump back into it.
We'll follow 6502 conventions and only save and restore the program counter for subroutines. Other CPUs may choose to save more state, but it's generally left up to the programmer to ensure they're not wiping out states in their subroutines (e.g., push the A register at the start of your subroutine if you're messing with it and restore it before you leave).
Adding an Extra Opcode Line
I've started running low on opcodes at this point. Luckily, we still have two free address lines we can use. To enable 5-bit opcodes, simply wire up the 4Q output of your upper 74LS173 register to A7 of your 28C16 ROM (this assumes your opcodes are at A3-A6).
Updating the ROM Writer
At this point, you simply need to update the Arduino writer to support 32 instructions vs. the current 16. So, for example, UCODE_TEMPLATE[16][8] becomes UCODE_TEMPLATE[32][8] and you fill in the 16 new array elements with nop. The problem is that the Arduino only has so much memory and with the way Ben's code is written to support conditional jumps, it starts to get tight.
I bet the code can be re-written to handle this, but I had a TL866II Plus EEPROM programmer handy from the 6502 build and I felt it would be easier to start using that instead. Converting to a regular C program is really simple (source code):
  1. Copy all the #define, global const arrays (don't forget to expand them from 16 to 32), and void initUCode(). Add #include and #include to the top.
  2. In your traditional int main (void) C function, after initializing with initUCode(), make two arrays: char ucode_upper[2048] and char ucode_lower[2048].
  3. Take your existing loop code that loops through all addresses: for (int address = 0; address < 2048; address++).
  4. Modify instruction to be 5-bit with int instruction = (address & 0b00011111000) >> 3;.
  5. When writing, just write to the arrays like so: ucode_lower[address] = ucode[flags][instruction][step]; and ucode_upper[address] = ucode[flags][instruction][step] >> 8;.
  6. Open a new file with FILE *f = fopen("rom_upper.hex", "wb");, write to it with fwrite(ucode_upper, sizeof(char), sizeof(ucode_upper), f); and close it with fclose(f);. Repeat this with the lower ROM too.
  7. Compile your code using gcc (you can use any C compiler), like so: gcc -Wall makerom.c -o makerom.
Running your program will spit out two binary files with the full contents of each ROM. Writing the file via the TL866II Plus requires minipro and the following command: minipro -p CAT28C16A -w rom_upper.hex.
Adding Subroutine Instructions
At this point, I cleaned up my instruction set layout a bit. I made psh and pop 1000 and 1001, respectively. I then created two new instructions: jsr and rts. These allow us to jump to a subroutine and returns from a subroutine. They're relatively simple:
  1. For jsr, the first three steps are the same as psh: MI|CO, RO|II|CE, MI|SO|SA.
  2. On the next step, instead of AO we use CO to save the program counter to the stack: CO|RI|SP|SA.
  3. We then essentially read the 2nd byte to do a jump and terminate: MI|CO, RO|J.
  4. For rts, the first four steps are the same as pop: MI|CO, RO|II|CE, SM, MI|SO|SA.
  5. On the next step, instead of AI we use J to load the program counter with the contents in stack: RO|J|SA.
  6. We're not done! If we just left this as-is, we'd jump to the 2nd byte of jsr which is not an opcode, but a memory address. All hell would break loose! We need to add a CE step to increment the program counter and then terminate.
Once you update the ROM, you should have fully functioning subroutines with 5-bit opcodes. One great way to test them is to create a recursive program to calculate something--just don't go too deep or you'll end up with a stack overflow!

Conclusion

And that's it! Another successful upgrade of your 8-bit CPU. You now have a very capable machine and toolchain. At this point I would have a bunch of fun with the software aspects. In terms of hardware, there's a number of ways to go from here:
  1. Interrupts. Interrupts are just special subroutines triggered by an external line. You can make one similar to how Ben did conditional jumps. The only added complexity is the need to load/save the flags register since an interrupt can happen at any time and you don't want to destroy the state. Given this would take more than 8 steps, you'd also need to add another line for the step counter (see below).
  2. ROM expansion. At this point, address lines on the ROM are getting tight which limits any expansion possibilities. With the new approach to ROM programming, it's trivial to switch out the 28C16 for the 28C256 that Ben uses in the 6502. These give you 4 additional address lines for flags/interrupts, opcodes, and steps.
  3. LCD output. At this point, adding a 16x2 character LCD like Ben uses in the 6502 is very possible.
  4. Segment/bank register. It's essentially a 2nd memory address register that lets you access 256-byte segments/banks of RAM using bank switching. This lets you take full advantage of the 32K of RAM in the Cypress chip.
  5. Fast increment instructions. Add these to registers by replacing 74LS173s with 74LS193s, allowing you to more quickly increment without going through the ALU. This is used to speed up loops and array operations.
submitted by MironV to beneater [link] [comments]

A Complete Penetration Testing & Hacking Tools List for Hackers & Security Professionals

A Complete Penetration Testing & Hacking Tools List for Hackers & Security Professionals

https://i.redd.it/7hvs58an33e41.gif
Penetration testing & Hacking Tools are more often used by security industries to test the vulnerabilities in network and applications. Here you can find the Comprehensive Penetration testing & Hacking Tools list that covers Performing Penetration testing Operation in all the Environment. Penetration testing and ethical hacking tools are a very essential part of every organization to test the vulnerabilities and patch the vulnerable system.
Also, Read What is Penetration Testing? How to do Penetration Testing?
Penetration Testing & Hacking Tools ListOnline Resources – Hacking ToolsPenetration Testing Resources
Exploit Development
OSINT Resources
Social Engineering Resources
Lock Picking Resources
Operating Systems
Hacking ToolsPenetration Testing Distributions
  • Kali – GNU/Linux distribution designed for digital forensics and penetration testing Hacking Tools
  • ArchStrike – Arch GNU/Linux repository for security professionals and enthusiasts.
  • BlackArch – Arch GNU/Linux-based distribution with best Hacking Tools for penetration testers and security researchers.
  • Network Security Toolkit (NST) – Fedora-based bootable live operating system designed to provide easy access to best-of-breed open source network security applications.
  • Pentoo – Security-focused live CD based on Gentoo.
  • BackBox – Ubuntu-based distribution for penetration tests and security assessments.
  • Parrot – Distribution similar to Kali, with multiple architectures with 100 of Hacking Tools.
  • Buscador – GNU/Linux virtual machine that is pre-configured for online investigators.
  • Fedora Security Lab – provides a safe test environment to work on security auditing, forensics, system rescue, and teaching security testing methodologies.
  • The Pentesters Framework – Distro organized around the Penetration Testing Execution Standard (PTES), providing a curated collection of utilities that eliminates often unused toolchains.
  • AttifyOS – GNU/Linux distribution focused on tools useful during the Internet of Things (IoT) security assessments.
Docker for Penetration Testing
Multi-paradigm Frameworks
  • Metasploit – post-exploitation Hacking Tools for offensive security teams to help verify vulnerabilities and manage security assessments.
  • Armitage – Java-based GUI front-end for the Metasploit Framework.
  • Faraday – Multiuser integrated pentesting environment for red teams performing cooperative penetration tests, security audits, and risk assessments.
  • ExploitPack – Graphical tool for automating penetration tests that ships with many pre-packaged exploits.
  • Pupy – Cross-platform (Windows, Linux, macOS, Android) remote administration and post-exploitation tool,
Vulnerability Scanners
  • Nexpose – Commercial vulnerability and risk management assessment engine that integrates with Metasploit, sold by Rapid7.
  • Nessus – Commercial vulnerability management, configuration, and compliance assessment platform, sold by Tenable.
  • OpenVAS – Free software implementation of the popular Nessus vulnerability assessment system.
  • Vuls – Agentless vulnerability scanner for GNU/Linux and FreeBSD, written in Go.
Static Analyzers
  • Brakeman – Static analysis security vulnerability scanner for Ruby on Rails applications.
  • cppcheck – Extensible C/C++ static analyzer focused on finding bugs.
  • FindBugs – Free software static analyzer to look for bugs in Java code.
  • sobelow – Security-focused static analysis for the Phoenix Framework.
  • bandit – Security oriented static analyzer for Python code.
Web Scanners
  • Nikto – Noisy but fast black box web server and web application vulnerability scanner.
  • Arachni – Scriptable framework for evaluating the security of web applications.
  • w3af – Hacking Tools for Web application attack and audit framework.
  • Wapiti – Black box web application vulnerability scanner with built-in fuzzer.
  • SecApps – In-browser web application security testing suite.
  • WebReaver – Commercial, graphical web application vulnerability scanner designed for macOS.
  • WPScan – Hacking Tools of the Black box WordPress vulnerability scanner.
  • cms-explorer – Reveal the specific modules, plugins, components and themes that various websites powered by content management systems are running.
  • joomscan – one of the best Hacking Tools for Joomla vulnerability scanner.
  • ACSTIS – Automated client-side template injection (sandbox escape/bypass) detection for AngularJS.
Network Tools
  • zmap – Open source network scanner that enables researchers to easily perform Internet-wide network studies.
  • nmap – Free security scanner for network exploration & security audits.
  • pig – one of the Hacking Tools forGNU/Linux packet crafting.
  • scanless – Utility for using websites to perform port scans on your behalf so as not to reveal your own IP.
  • tcpdump/libpcap – Common packet analyzer that runs under the command line.
  • Wireshark – Widely-used graphical, cross-platform network protocol analyzer.
  • Network-Tools.com – Website offering an interface to numerous basic network utilities like ping, traceroute, whois, and more.
  • netsniff-ng – Swiss army knife for network sniffing.
  • Intercepter-NG – Multifunctional network toolkit.
  • SPARTA – Graphical interface offering scriptable, configurable access to existing network infrastructure scanning and enumeration tools.
  • dnschef – Highly configurable DNS proxy for pentesters.
  • DNSDumpster – one of the Hacking Tools for Online DNS recon and search service.
  • CloudFail – Unmask server IP addresses hidden behind Cloudflare by searching old database records and detecting misconfigured DNS.
  • dnsenum – Perl script that enumerates DNS information from a domain, attempts zone transfers, performs a brute force dictionary style attack and then performs reverse look-ups on the results.
  • dnsmap – One of the Hacking Tools for Passive DNS network mapper.
  • dnsrecon – One of the Hacking Tools for DNS enumeration script.
  • dnstracer – Determines where a given DNS server gets its information from, and follows the chain of DNS servers.
  • passivedns-client – Library and query tool for querying several passive DNS providers.
  • passivedns – Network sniffer that logs all DNS server replies for use in a passive DNS setup.
  • Mass Scan – best Hacking Tools for TCP port scanner, spews SYN packets asynchronously, scanning the entire Internet in under 5 minutes.
  • Zarp – Network attack tool centered around the exploitation of local networks.
  • mitmproxy – Interactive TLS-capable intercepting HTTP proxy for penetration testers and software developers.
  • Morpheus – Automated ettercap TCP/IP Hacking Tools .
  • mallory – HTTP/HTTPS proxy over SSH.
  • SSH MITM – Intercept SSH connections with a proxy; all plaintext passwords and sessions are logged to disk.
  • Netzob – Reverse engineering, traffic generation and fuzzing of communication protocols.
  • DET – Proof of concept to perform data exfiltration using either single or multiple channel(s) at the same time.
  • pwnat – Punches holes in firewalls and NATs.
  • dsniff – Collection of tools for network auditing and pentesting.
  • tgcd – Simple Unix network utility to extend the accessibility of TCP/IP based network services beyond firewalls.
  • smbmap – Handy SMB enumeration tool.
  • scapy – Python-based interactive packet manipulation program & library.
  • Dshell – Network forensic analysis framework.
  • Debookee – Simple and powerful network traffic analyzer for macOS.
  • Dripcap – Caffeinated packet analyzer.
  • Printer Exploitation Toolkit (PRET) – Tool for printer security testing capable of IP and USB connectivity, fuzzing, and exploitation of PostScript, PJL, and PCL printer language features.
  • Praeda – Automated multi-function printer data harvester for gathering usable data during security assessments.
  • routersploit – Open source exploitation framework similar to Metasploit but dedicated to embedded devices.
  • evilgrade – Modular framework to take advantage of poor upgrade implementations by injecting fake updates.
  • XRay – Network (sub)domain discovery and reconnaissance automation tool.
  • Ettercap – Comprehensive, mature suite for machine-in-the-middle attacks.
  • BetterCAP – Modular, portable and easily extensible MITM framework.
  • CrackMapExec – A swiss army knife for pentesting networks.
  • impacket – A collection of Python classes for working with network protocols.
Wireless Network Hacking Tools
  • Aircrack-ng – Set of Penetration testing & Hacking Tools list for auditing wireless networks.
  • Kismet – Wireless network detector, sniffer, and IDS.
  • Reaver – Brute force attack against Wifi Protected Setup.
  • Wifite – Automated wireless attack tool.
  • Fluxion – Suite of automated social engineering-based WPA attacks.
Transport Layer Security Tools
  • SSLyze – Fast and comprehensive TLS/SSL configuration analyzer to help identify security misconfigurations.
  • tls_prober – Fingerprint a server’s SSL/TLS implementation.
  • testssl.sh – Command-line tool which checks a server’s service on any port for the support of TLS/SSL ciphers, protocols as well as some cryptographic flaws.
Web Exploitation
  • OWASP Zed Attack Proxy (ZAP) – Feature-rich, scriptable HTTP intercepting proxy and fuzzer for penetration testing web applications.
  • Fiddler – Free cross-platform web debugging proxy with user-friendly companion tools.
  • Burp Suite – One of the Hacking Tools ntegrated platform for performing security testing of web applications.
  • autochrome – Easy to install a test browser with all the appropriate settings needed for web application testing with native Burp support, from NCCGroup.
  • Browser Exploitation Framework (BeEF) – Command and control server for delivering exploits to commandeered Web browsers.
  • Offensive Web Testing Framework (OWTF) – Python-based framework for pentesting Web applications based on the OWASP Testing Guide.
  • WordPress Exploit Framework – Ruby framework for developing and using modules which aid in the penetration testing of WordPress powered websites and systems.
  • WPSploit – Exploit WordPress-powered websites with Metasploit.
  • SQLmap – Automatic SQL injection and database takeover tool.
  • tplmap – Automatic server-side template injection and Web server takeover Hacking Tools.
  • weevely3 – Weaponized web shell.
  • Wappalyzer – Wappalyzer uncovers the technologies used on websites.
  • WhatWeb – Website fingerprinter.
  • BlindElephant – Web application fingerprinter.
  • wafw00f – Identifies and fingerprints Web Application Firewall (WAF) products.
  • fimap – Find, prepare, audit, exploit and even google automatically for LFI/RFI bugs.
  • Kadabra – Automatic LFI exploiter and scanner.
  • Kadimus – LFI scan and exploit tool.
  • liffy – LFI exploitation tool.
  • Commix – Automated all-in-one operating system command injection and exploitation tool.
  • DVCS Ripper – Rip web-accessible (distributed) version control systems: SVN/GIT/HG/BZR.
  • GitTools – One of the Hacking Tools that Automatically find and download Web-accessible .git repositories.
  • sslstrip –One of the Hacking Tools Demonstration of the HTTPS stripping attacks.
  • sslstrip2 – SSLStrip version to defeat HSTS.
  • NoSQLmap – Automatic NoSQL injection and database takeover tool.
  • VHostScan – A virtual host scanner that performs reverse lookups, can be used with pivot tools, detect catch-all scenarios, aliases, and dynamic default pages.
  • FuzzDB – Dictionary of attack patterns and primitives for black-box application fault injection and resource discovery.
  • EyeWitness – Tool to take screenshots of websites, provide some server header info, and identify default credentials if possible.
  • webscreenshot – A simple script to take screenshots of the list of websites.
Hex Editors
  • HexEdit.js – Browser-based hex editing.
  • Hexinator – World’s finest (proprietary, commercial) Hex Editor.
  • Frhed – Binary file editor for Windows.
  • 0xED – Native macOS hex editor that supports plug-ins to display custom data types.
File Format Analysis Tools
  • Kaitai Struct – File formats and network protocols dissection language and web IDE, generating parsers in C++, C#, Java, JavaScript, Perl, PHP, Python, Ruby.
  • Veles – Binary data visualization and analysis tool.
  • Hachoir – Python library to view and edit a binary stream as the tree of fields and tools for metadata extraction.
read more https://oyeitshacker.blogspot.com/2020/01/penetration-testing-hacking-tools.html
submitted by icssindia to HowToHack [link] [comments]

A Complete Penetration Testing & Hacking Tools List for Hackers & Security Professionals

A Complete Penetration Testing & Hacking Tools List for Hackers & Security Professionals

penetration-testing-hacking-tools
Penetration testing & Hacking Tools are more often used by security industries to test the vulnerabilities in network and applications. Here you can find the Comprehensive Penetration testing & Hacking Tools list that covers Performing Penetration testing Operation in all the Environment. Penetration testing and ethical hacking tools are a very essential part of every organization to test the vulnerabilities and patch the vulnerable system.
Also, Read What is Penetration Testing? How to do Penetration Testing?
Penetration Testing & Hacking Tools ListOnline Resources – Hacking ToolsPenetration Testing Resources
Exploit Development
OSINT Resources
Social Engineering Resources
Lock Picking Resources
Operating Systems
Hacking ToolsPenetration Testing Distributions
  • Kali – GNU/Linux distribution designed for digital forensics and penetration testing Hacking Tools
  • ArchStrike – Arch GNU/Linux repository for security professionals and enthusiasts.
  • BlackArch – Arch GNU/Linux-based distribution with best Hacking Tools for penetration testers and security researchers.
  • Network Security Toolkit (NST) – Fedora-based bootable live operating system designed to provide easy access to best-of-breed open source network security applications.
  • Pentoo – Security-focused live CD based on Gentoo.
  • BackBox – Ubuntu-based distribution for penetration tests and security assessments.
  • Parrot – Distribution similar to Kali, with multiple architectures with 100 of Hacking Tools.
  • Buscador – GNU/Linux virtual machine that is pre-configured for online investigators.
  • Fedora Security Lab – provides a safe test environment to work on security auditing, forensics, system rescue, and teaching security testing methodologies.
  • The Pentesters Framework – Distro organized around the Penetration Testing Execution Standard (PTES), providing a curated collection of utilities that eliminates often unused toolchains.
  • AttifyOS – GNU/Linux distribution focused on tools useful during the Internet of Things (IoT) security assessments.
Docker for Penetration Testing
Multi-paradigm Frameworks
  • Metasploit – post-exploitation Hacking Tools for offensive security teams to help verify vulnerabilities and manage security assessments.
  • Armitage – Java-based GUI front-end for the Metasploit Framework.
  • Faraday – Multiuser integrated pentesting environment for red teams performing cooperative penetration tests, security audits, and risk assessments.
  • ExploitPack – Graphical tool for automating penetration tests that ships with many pre-packaged exploits.
  • Pupy – Cross-platform (Windows, Linux, macOS, Android) remote administration and post-exploitation tool,
Vulnerability Scanners
  • Nexpose – Commercial vulnerability and risk management assessment engine that integrates with Metasploit, sold by Rapid7.
  • Nessus – Commercial vulnerability management, configuration, and compliance assessment platform, sold by Tenable.
  • OpenVAS – Free software implementation of the popular Nessus vulnerability assessment system.
  • Vuls – Agentless vulnerability scanner for GNU/Linux and FreeBSD, written in Go.
Static Analyzers
  • Brakeman – Static analysis security vulnerability scanner for Ruby on Rails applications.
  • cppcheck – Extensible C/C++ static analyzer focused on finding bugs.
  • FindBugs – Free software static analyzer to look for bugs in Java code.
  • sobelow – Security-focused static analysis for the Phoenix Framework.
  • bandit – Security oriented static analyzer for Python code.
Web Scanners
  • Nikto – Noisy but fast black box web server and web application vulnerability scanner.
  • Arachni – Scriptable framework for evaluating the security of web applications.
  • w3af – Hacking Tools for Web application attack and audit framework.
  • Wapiti – Black box web application vulnerability scanner with built-in fuzzer.
  • SecApps – In-browser web application security testing suite.
  • WebReaver – Commercial, graphical web application vulnerability scanner designed for macOS.
  • WPScan – Hacking Tools of the Black box WordPress vulnerability scanner.
  • cms-explorer – Reveal the specific modules, plugins, components and themes that various websites powered by content management systems are running.
  • joomscan – one of the best Hacking Tools for Joomla vulnerability scanner.
  • ACSTIS – Automated client-side template injection (sandbox escape/bypass) detection for AngularJS.
Network Tools
  • zmap – Open source network scanner that enables researchers to easily perform Internet-wide network studies.
  • nmap – Free security scanner for network exploration & security audits.
  • pig – one of the Hacking Tools forGNU/Linux packet crafting.
  • scanless – Utility for using websites to perform port scans on your behalf so as not to reveal your own IP.
  • tcpdump/libpcap – Common packet analyzer that runs under the command line.
  • Wireshark – Widely-used graphical, cross-platform network protocol analyzer.
  • Network-Tools.com – Website offering an interface to numerous basic network utilities like ping, traceroute, whois, and more.
  • netsniff-ng – Swiss army knife for network sniffing.
  • Intercepter-NG – Multifunctional network toolkit.
  • SPARTA – Graphical interface offering scriptable, configurable access to existing network infrastructure scanning and enumeration tools.
  • dnschef – Highly configurable DNS proxy for pentesters.
  • DNSDumpster – one of the Hacking Tools for Online DNS recon and search service.
  • CloudFail – Unmask server IP addresses hidden behind Cloudflare by searching old database records and detecting misconfigured DNS.
  • dnsenum – Perl script that enumerates DNS information from a domain, attempts zone transfers, performs a brute force dictionary style attack and then performs reverse look-ups on the results.
  • dnsmap – One of the Hacking Tools for Passive DNS network mapper.
  • dnsrecon – One of the Hacking Tools for DNS enumeration script.
  • dnstracer – Determines where a given DNS server gets its information from, and follows the chain of DNS servers.
  • passivedns-client – Library and query tool for querying several passive DNS providers.
  • passivedns – Network sniffer that logs all DNS server replies for use in a passive DNS setup.
  • Mass Scan – best Hacking Tools for TCP port scanner, spews SYN packets asynchronously, scanning the entire Internet in under 5 minutes.
  • Zarp – Network attack tool centered around the exploitation of local networks.
  • mitmproxy – Interactive TLS-capable intercepting HTTP proxy for penetration testers and software developers.
  • Morpheus – Automated ettercap TCP/IP Hacking Tools .
  • mallory – HTTP/HTTPS proxy over SSH.
  • SSH MITM – Intercept SSH connections with a proxy; all plaintext passwords and sessions are logged to disk.
  • Netzob – Reverse engineering, traffic generation and fuzzing of communication protocols.
  • DET – Proof of concept to perform data exfiltration using either single or multiple channel(s) at the same time.
  • pwnat – Punches holes in firewalls and NATs.
  • dsniff – Collection of tools for network auditing and pentesting.
  • tgcd – Simple Unix network utility to extend the accessibility of TCP/IP based network services beyond firewalls.
  • smbmap – Handy SMB enumeration tool.
  • scapy – Python-based interactive packet manipulation program & library.
  • Dshell – Network forensic analysis framework.
  • Debookee – Simple and powerful network traffic analyzer for macOS.
  • Dripcap – Caffeinated packet analyzer.
  • Printer Exploitation Toolkit (PRET) – Tool for printer security testing capable of IP and USB connectivity, fuzzing, and exploitation of PostScript, PJL, and PCL printer language features.
  • Praeda – Automated multi-function printer data harvester for gathering usable data during security assessments.
  • routersploit – Open source exploitation framework similar to Metasploit but dedicated to embedded devices.
  • evilgrade – Modular framework to take advantage of poor upgrade implementations by injecting fake updates.
  • XRay – Network (sub)domain discovery and reconnaissance automation tool.
  • Ettercap – Comprehensive, mature suite for machine-in-the-middle attacks.
  • BetterCAP – Modular, portable and easily extensible MITM framework.
  • CrackMapExec – A swiss army knife for pentesting networks.
  • impacket – A collection of Python classes for working with network protocols.
Wireless Network Hacking Tools
  • Aircrack-ng – Set of Penetration testing & Hacking Tools list for auditing wireless networks.
  • Kismet – Wireless network detector, sniffer, and IDS.
  • Reaver – Brute force attack against Wifi Protected Setup.
  • Wifite – Automated wireless attack tool.
  • Fluxion – Suite of automated social engineering-based WPA attacks.
Transport Layer Security Tools
  • SSLyze – Fast and comprehensive TLS/SSL configuration analyzer to help identify security misconfigurations.
  • tls_prober – Fingerprint a server’s SSL/TLS implementation.
  • testssl.sh – Command-line tool which checks a server’s service on any port for the support of TLS/SSL ciphers, protocols as well as some cryptographic flaws.
Web Exploitation
  • OWASP Zed Attack Proxy (ZAP) – Feature-rich, scriptable HTTP intercepting proxy and fuzzer for penetration testing web applications.
  • Fiddler – Free cross-platform web debugging proxy with user-friendly companion tools.
  • Burp Suite – One of the Hacking Tools ntegrated platform for performing security testing of web applications.
  • autochrome – Easy to install a test browser with all the appropriate settings needed for web application testing with native Burp support, from NCCGroup.
  • Browser Exploitation Framework (BeEF) – Command and control server for delivering exploits to commandeered Web browsers.
  • Offensive Web Testing Framework (OWTF) – Python-based framework for pentesting Web applications based on the OWASP Testing Guide.
  • WordPress Exploit Framework – Ruby framework for developing and using modules which aid in the penetration testing of WordPress powered websites and systems.
  • WPSploit – Exploit WordPress-powered websites with Metasploit.
  • SQLmap – Automatic SQL injection and database takeover tool.
  • tplmap – Automatic server-side template injection and Web server takeover Hacking Tools.
  • weevely3 – Weaponized web shell.
  • Wappalyzer – Wappalyzer uncovers the technologies used on websites.
  • WhatWeb – Website fingerprinter.
  • BlindElephant – Web application fingerprinter.
  • wafw00f – Identifies and fingerprints Web Application Firewall (WAF) products.
  • fimap – Find, prepare, audit, exploit and even google automatically for LFI/RFI bugs.
  • Kadabra – Automatic LFI exploiter and scanner.
  • Kadimus – LFI scan and exploit tool.
  • liffy – LFI exploitation tool.
  • Commix – Automated all-in-one operating system command injection and exploitation tool.
  • DVCS Ripper – Rip web-accessible (distributed) version control systems: SVN/GIT/HG/BZR.
  • GitTools – One of the Hacking Tools that Automatically find and download Web-accessible .git repositories.
  • sslstrip –One of the Hacking Tools Demonstration of the HTTPS stripping attacks.
  • sslstrip2 – SSLStrip version to defeat HSTS.
  • NoSQLmap – Automatic NoSQL injection and database takeover tool.
  • VHostScan – A virtual host scanner that performs reverse lookups, can be used with pivot tools, detect catch-all scenarios, aliases, and dynamic default pages.
  • FuzzDB – Dictionary of attack patterns and primitives for black-box application fault injection and resource discovery.
  • EyeWitness – Tool to take screenshots of websites, provide some server header info, and identify default credentials if possible.
  • webscreenshot – A simple script to take screenshots of the list of websites.
Hex Editors
  • HexEdit.js – Browser-based hex editing.
  • Hexinator – World’s finest (proprietary, commercial) Hex Editor.
  • Frhed – Binary file editor for Windows.
  • 0xED – Native macOS hex editor that supports plug-ins to display custom data types.
File Format Analysis Tools
  • Kaitai Struct – File formats and network protocols dissection language and web IDE, generating parsers in C++, C#, Java, JavaScript, Perl, PHP, Python, Ruby.
  • Veles – Binary data visualization and analysis tool.
  • Hachoir – Python library to view and edit a binary stream as the tree of fields and tools for metadata extraction.
read more https://oyeitshacker.blogspot.com/2020/01/penetration-testing-hacking-tools.html
submitted by icssindia to Hacking_Tutorials [link] [comments]

SignedUrl upload is corrupting images (JPEG, PNG) but PDFs are fine?

After trying all combinations and tutorials I could find I have had no luck, so I'm hoping someone here will be able to spot what I'm doing wrong.
In Node.js I create my signed URL like this: ``` const { fileName, fileType } = req.query;
const s3 = new aws.S3({ accessKeyId: s3AccessKeyId, secretAccessKey: s3AccessKeySecret });
const url = await s3.getSignedUrlPromise( 'putObject', { Bucket: s3BucketName, Key: fileName, Expires: 60, ContentType: "binary/octet-stream", ACL: 'public-read' } ); ```
And then I upload the image (using the same fileName) through Postman with the following options: Method: PUT Body: form-data, key: , value
The file is successfully uploaded to my bucket with the same name and extension. But when I download it from the AWS dashboard or try to view it from the link it is corrupted. My mac says that it cannot be opened because it's not recognised.
The exact same setup but to upload a PDF works like a charm. I can't figure out where I'm going wrong. Any pointers?
submitted by zmasta94 to aws [link] [comments]

Success To Be [OC, M.2 DualBoot, AMD R5, RX 5700 XT, 16GB RAM, BCM94360CD]

Success To Be [OC, M.2 DualBoot, AMD R5, RX 5700 XT, 16GB RAM, BCM94360CD]
--OUT OF DATE--

OpenCore AMD DualBoot Hackintosh! This would absolutely not have been possible without this community and especially Khronokernel! Many, many thanks - this is my first Hackintosh and self-built PC!! :D
https://preview.redd.it/ciem302abff41.png?width=1920&format=png&auto=webp&s=e8d551bec88509a6ff164d27c528dde794a3070a

Components

See also: OpenCore config below!
Part Model
Motherboard MSI B450 GAMING PRO CARBON AC ATX AM4
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 3.8GHz 6C
Video Card PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT 8GB Red Devil
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 2 x 8 GB DDR4-3200C14
Storage ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 2TB M.2-2280 NVMe SSD
Power Supply Corsair HX750 750W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX
CPU Cooler Noctua NH-D15S
Case Fan 2x Noctua NF-A14 PWM 140 mm
Thermal Paste Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut, 1g
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower
Monitor AOC 24G2U/BK 24" 1920x1080 144Hz
Keyboard Apple MB110LL/B Wired
Mouse Logitech G Pro Wireless Optical
Wifi/BT Card via PCIe Fenvi BCM94360CD, AliExpress (Fenvi FV-A436CD)
USB 3.0 PCIe Card Some cheap thing (no brand found?!) I had laying around, not expected to work on macOS, good on Win10
PCPartPicker Part List (without BCM94360CD) About $1600, most parts - especially the expensive ones - where bought on sale, though!
I had these goals in mind:
  • Hackintosh, of course!
  • DualBoot
  • 2K Performance (Everyday PCing to AAA Gaming) with proper heat management, unlike Apple
  • Longevity, my previous Main, a MacBookPro 13'' (Early 2011), still flourishes! :) Good boi!
  • Low noise, hence the Powercolor Graphics Card and the beefy NH-D15S (also for performance)
  • As little dust as possible (see case)
  • As small as possible - without compromising on goals
  • As little RGB as possible (sorry.), which turns out to be difficult
Max credit goes here and here!! Also, here, here, here, here and here. Totally solid work, guys! This Project was started on December, 1st 2019. Now it is February, 7th 2020!

Features

  • Vanilla Hackintosh
  • OpenCore 0.5.5
  • DualBoot on one 2TB M.2 SSD with Win10
  • AMD Ryzen 5 Processor with RX 5700 XT (Navi 10) and 16GB RAM on MSI B450
  • Wifi and BT via BCM94360CD over PCIe (Windows compatible)
  • Sleep/wake works
  • Fixed iServices, even though I probably won't use them...
  • I consider my goals met.
  • Mapped USB ports, see below.

Known issues

  • Bluetooth is always "on", but not working. Probably USB Mapping; Resolved here.
  • Internal drives shown as externals (yellow-orange). Solved..
  • Black screen when setting resolution to 1080i instead of 1080p in system preferences. Minor issue.
  • Cannot boot into Recovery mode. Solved.
  • Won't sleep after set time (system prefs). "HibernateMode" set to "Auto" in config & port mapping KEXTs, see below.
  • Cannot adjust volume of built-in-monitor speaker (DisplayPort)~~~~. Solved with software.
  • Some Motherboard RGB issues - Solved by USB Mapping.
  • Choosing to boot into Windows via Bios (F11) - I don't consider this much of an issue.
I will try to solve these issues in separate threads and update this one, but any help much appreciated! Any comments - e.g. on Kexts; do I need them all?! - are welcome too...

Not tested yet

  • Microphone jack on case.
  • FileVault - don't need that, probably won't test

Advice for interested people


  • -- PLEASE BE ADISED THAT THERE ARE NEWER VERSIONS OF OPENCORE AND THAT THE PATH BELOW (ESPECIALLY THE CONFIG CHANGES) MIGHT NOT WORK WITH OC VERSIONS AFTER 0.5.5!! -- For a working EFI folder for OC 0.5.6 see in the comments.

My Hackintosh configuration

  • OpenCore 0.5.5
  • macOS Catalina 10.15.3
  • The following EFI is on my OpenCore stick. There is also the latest macOS on there. If you go for DualBoot, keep this stick around & updated as Windows seems to be able to mess around with your EFI... With this stick you'll always be able to boot your Hackintosh and repair its EFI partition.
  • FULL EFI FOLDER: See in comments ("PlatformInfo" has to be populated in config.plist - see below... You can copy over the info from your current config. Also, my changes in DeviceProperties/Add might be a problem for your storage setup.)
  • OpenCore EFI files:
  • Config.plist: http://www.filedropper.com/configreddit EDIT: See comments (only use if exactly same components as me; see below. Change according to OpenCore Guide!! [PlatformInfo removed; Populate this yourself like this!] I'd advice you to make your own config.plist.) Changed with ProperTree strictly according to the OpenCore Guide. Differences to sample.plist:
    • Probably outdated: All of the following modifications are for OC 0.5.5. If you are on a later version of OC it is likely that these have changed!
    • 5 initial Warnings removed.
    • DeviceProperties/Add: Removed "PciRoot(0x0)/Pci(0x1b,0x0)" and "PciRoot(0x0)/Pci(0x2,0x0)" as well as their children
      • Added Key "PciRoot(0x0)/Pci(0x1,0x1)/Pci(0x0,0x0)" as child of "Add" with Type "Directory". Added child beneath the just made child with name "built-in", type "Data" and value "01000000". To address drive issue above, see here.
    • Populated this config.plist with OC snapshot function of ProperTree (CMD/CTRL+R, point to EFI/OC/) . Adds KEXTs and SSDT.
    • Kernel/Emulate: Removed "CpuidMask" and "CpuidData" (were blank anyway).
    • Kernel/Patch: Ryzen/Threadripper(17h) Patch applied.
    • Kernel/Quirks:
      • "DummyPowerManagement" set to True
      • "ExternalDiskIcons" set to True
      • "PanicNoKextDump" set to True
      • "PowerTimeoutKernelPanic" set to True
      • "XhciPortLimit" set to True (set to False after USB mapping in step F)
    • Misc/Boot:
      • "HibernateMode" set "Auto" after USB mapping
    • Misc/Debug: Nothing changed.
    • Misc/Security:
      • "AllowNvramReset" set to True
      • "AllowSetDefault" set to True
      • "AuthRestart" left False
      • "RequireSignature" set to False
      • "RequireVault" set to False
      • "ScanPolicy" set to 0
    • Misc/Tools: Shell.efi added by the OC snapshot function.
    • NVRAM/7C436110-AB2A-4BBB-A880-FE41995C9F82:
      • "boot-args" set to "-v keepsyms=1 debug=0x100 agdpmod=pikera alcid=1"
      • "nvda_drv" set to <>
      • "prev-lang:kbd" set to my preferences. (Use "656E2D55 533A30" = HEX for keyboard layout "en-US:0"; find your own with a TEXT to HEX converter and this.
    • NVRAM/"WriteFlash" set to True,
    • PlatformInfo: Populated with info according to the Guide with GenSMBIOS. Went with a "iMacPro1,1". Found "Purchase Date not Validated" numbers after about 3 (x10) times.
    • UEFI/Drivers: Drivers auto-added by the OC snapshot function.
    • UEFI/Input:
      • "PointerSupport" changed to "Data" and set to <>
      • "PointerSupportMode" changed to "Data" and set to <>
    • UEFI/Protocols/"ConsoleControl" set to True
    • UEFI/Quirks:
      • "ProvideConsoleGop" set to True
      • "RequestBootVarFallback" set to True
  • Bios settings strictly according to the OpenCoreGuide:
    • Disabled:
      • "Fast Boot"
      • "CSM" [UEFI instead]
    • Enabled:
      • "EHCI/XHCI Hand-off"
      • "Above 4G decoding"

My process (only successful part)

(You'll need 3 USB sticks! 2 with at least 4GB, 1 with at least 8GB. I am not sure, whether the Linux Part is really necessary, or if the partitioning can also be done from the macOS or Win10 stick...)
A) The basic build
  1. Built PC.
  2. Installed Windows 10 from USB stick [8GB] (made from Microsoft Media Creation Tool, instructions here, don't forget to install in UEFI mode - see second link in 3.!). Did some fan adjustments in BIOS too... Keep that stick!
  3. Set up Windows 10, installed drivers (see here, here).
  4. Installed Python 3.7! (For SSDTTime, below. Don't get Python 3.8.1!)
Do not set up Windows too much yet, it will be deleted completely and reinstalled again.

B) Creating the OpenCore Stick
  1. Followed Snazzy Lab's Video (read its description!) to create the OpenCore stick, everything on the above Win10: (useful additional help: khronokernel and VanillaAMD and Github)
    1. (Maybe format your stick to GUID HFS+ via Linux or Mac first... See Github.)
    2. Downloaded latest macOS via gibMacOs.bat (Recovery package!) (Admin privileges needed!). Update 7zip first for step B)1.II. and B)1.III. and use a Lan connection!
    3. Made a bootable install of that via Makeinstall.bat (Number + o) (Admin privileges needed!).
    4. Opened the EFI folder on the now newly made USB stick.
    5. Deleted everything (3 files) in EFI/OC/Drivers/, except FwRuntimeServices.efi.
    6. Deleted everything (2 files) in EFI/OC/Tools/.
  2. Put in the following drivers from AppleSupportPkg on the stick to EFI/OC/Drivers/:
    1. ApfsDriverLoader.efi
    2. VBoxHfs.efi
  3. Put KEXT and SSDT and Drivers on the stick:
    1. For troubleshooting afterwards - while booting from the stick - consult: khronokernel/troubleshooting!!
    2. Put the above KEXTs on the stick, all in EFI/OC/Kexts (instructions: khronokernel, more kexts: onedrive).
    3. Put the following SSDTs on my stick (into OC/ACPI)
      1. See above! SSDTTime not needed.
    4. Created config.plist with ProperTree (search with crtl+f!) (full instructions: khronokernel plus config documentation mentioned above in B)3.a.!!):
      1. Renamed "simple.plist" in the downloaded OpenCorePkg folder to "config.plist" and copied it over to the stick into EFI/OC/.
      2. Open Propertree.bat (Admin privileges maybe needed!) and opened said config.plist via the menu bar "File" of proper tree.
      3. Created my own config via "OC snapshot" in the menu bar "File", navigated to EFI/OC of my stick.
      4. Patched my config with patches.plist from AMD_Vanilla (17h): Open simultaneously in ProperTree. (See Snazzy Laps Video and this on how!)
    5. Edited config.plist, followed Vanilla Guide/amd-config.plist (partly later because of errors): See above!
    6. Saved via menu bar "File".

C) Created bootable Linux stick and made partitions on my internal SSD for dual boot (I was recommended this procedure here), install macOS:
  1. Still in Windows 10: Followed the Ubuntu Tutorial to make another stick.
  2. Shut down Windows 10.
  3. Booted again, with the OpenCore Stick connected, temporarily changed the boot partition with F11 and chose my stick (some of the above mentioned config.plist changes were applied AFTER this step, because certain errors occured):
  4. Got to the boot picker and reset NVRAM.
  5. Restarted the same way and chose the macOS installer (Step 3).
  6. Went into the macOS installer's Disk Manager. Formatted the whole internal SSD (maybe ExFat? Probably doesn't matter) and made two partitions for macOS (APFS) and Windows (don't remember what, maybe ExFat?, doesn't matter)
  7. Exit the Disk Manager and enter the installer. Install macOS. Maybe create a backup of that.
  8. Do this: Especially the EFI copying! How to mount the EFI partition on macOS.
  9. Shut down.

E) Created Windows:
  1. Booted into Linux, via Stick.
  2. Got synaptic and hfsprogs for Linux:
    1. Searched the Programs for "Software & Updates". Enable second option: Community-maintained free and open-source software (universe). "Close" this window and let it do it's download.
    2. Opened Terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T), entered:
      1. sudo apt-get update
      2. sudo apt-get install synaptic
      3. sudo apt-get install hfsprogs (not needed anymore?!)
  3. Searched for "Disks". Designated the 200MB partition from above as EFI (I believe via the cog wheels > Format Partition). Close that window.
  4. Searched in progs for "GParted":
    1. Format the second, partition to NTFS.
    2. (You should see three partitions on your internal SSD: EFI, Mac (APFS - probably unrecognised) and Windows)
  5. Shut down Linux.
  6. Boot with Windows Stick connected into the Windows installer.
  7. Install Windows on that NTFS partition.
  8. (Mac and Windows will write their EFI on the same partition! Keep at least your OpenCore Stick!!)
F) Finished. Set up both machines (Windows: here and here) completely!! :D
  • Mapped my ports by removing the XHC0 controller with this kext completely (lost two ports in the process, but that's ok) and (optionally) mapped the PTXH controller with this kext (you might have to adjust this!). For why, see here. See here and here, too!
  • Disabled OpenCore logging: Values set to 0. (In config above not included!)
  • Found "valid" SMBIOS numbers, fixed iServices according to this. (In config above not included!)
  • Didn't enable FileVault or OpenCore Security Features yet... Probably won't.
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Binary options trading Tutorial for the beginners - YouTube

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